Getting a Job: What You Need To Know.

With the end of the semester only a few weeks away, many students have turned their attention to what comes next: joining the workforce! We have seen many students in the last few weeks who are feeling anxious about this next step in their lives, while others have shared their concerns about all the headlines surrounding uncertainty in the labour market.

Feeling anxious and concerned about transitioning from student to employee is a normal part of the process as it involves change and the unknown. “What if I find a job, and hate it? Worse yet, what if I can’t find a job at all?” These are the type of questions we see students grappling with.

The first thing we remind students is that there are things within their control, and things outside of their control. We cannot control the global markets, economic conditions, the companies that are hiring, the number of jobseekers in the labour market, or the methods companies choose to advertise their job openings.

What we can control, however, is our response to the uncertainty. And the best way to navigate uncertainty is through preparedness. How are you going to make yourself stand out in a sea of job applicants with similar credentials or more experience? What can you do now to increase your chances of finding meaningful work? Preparing for your job search is well within your control so understanding what factors you need to consider is your first step.

The first factor within your control is your mindset. In a tight labour market, it can be easy to feel discouraged, deflated, and impatient with the process. Approaching your job search with positivity and being prepared to put in the effort and time to be successful will help. Every single job you apply to will require your very best effort. Every. Single. Application.

Why? Employers notice the amount of time you invested in crafting your resume/cover letter or preparing for an interview. The better prepared you are, the more appeal you will have to them because that in itself says something about your work ethic and interest in them as an employer. They want engaged employees who care about the quality of their work. Going into your job search with a positive mindset, attitude, and willingness to invest the time and effort to produce a high quality application, will set the foundation for success.

The second factor within your control is getting to know yourself. Many students laugh when we say this to them, but how much time have you honestly invested in thinking about your skills, abilities, and competencies so that you can make them relevant to different contexts? According to job search website, Glassdoor, “on average, corporate job openings attract between 100 – 250 resumes. But only 4 – 6 of those applicants will be called for an interview, and only 1 will be offered a job” (Economy, 2015).  And based on a survey conducted by LinkedIn, employers will only spend 6 seconds to initially review your resume (Friedman, 2017). So out of 250 resumes sent to an employer, and a 6-second look at each, which resumes will stand out? The ones that quickly, concisely, and clearly relate their skills, abilities, and competencies to the specific job. It is not up to the employer to determine from your resume IF your skills will fit. It is up to you, the jobseeker, to tell them EXACTLY how they fit. So back to the original question….how much time have you honestly invested in thinking about your skills, abilities, and competencies so that you can make them relevant to different contexts? When students answer this question honestly, the vast majority say hardly ever. Yet this is a critical part of your job search. It helps you to identify where you would be a good fit, why you would be a good fit, and guides you in preparing a good resume and interview.

The third factor within your control is research. Benjamin Franklin said “an investment in knowledge, pays the best interest”. The more you know about a company, the more you know about yourself, and how this knowledge intersects will be beneficial to both you and the company. When conducting research, review the employer’s website – what are their values, what keywords are common, what can you ascertain from this information to determine how you would be a good fit? When you find a job ad, look once again for the keywords – what qualifications and skills do they mention? What is important to them in a job candidate? Then use this information to tailor your resume and cover letter to match their needs. 

Which brings us to the next factor within your control: Self-Marketing. Self-marketing is how you describe and differentiate yourself to others. When you see ads for products, the companies want to highlight a certain image of their brand to entice you to buy it. In self-marketing, you are the brand, and the image you convey should appeal to employers to entice them to meet you for an interview. Your resume, cover letter, portfolio, email content, social media pages, and interview are modes of self-marketing. What message are you conveying to others?

Your cover letter, resume, and portfolio each serve specific purposes within a job search. A cover letter introduces you to an employer and provides specific details as to what job you are applying to and why you are a good fit for the organization. The resume is an overview or ‘evidence’ of the skills, experiences, and education that you have to meet their unique needs. A portfolio provides further support and proof to back up what you are telling them. We like to compare these three documents to a movie trailer. It provides just enough information to capture the interest of the viewer and encourage them to want to see the feature presentation (which in this case, would be you, for an interview).

The most important thing to remember when writing resumes and cover letters, is to create them from the employers’ perspective. Everything in these documents should tell the employer what’s in it for them? What will they get, and how will they benefit, from hiring you? Every skill you mention, every educational experience, and work experience you highlight should be written in a manner that makes it relevant to their job, company, and industry. For example, if you have worked in food services for the past 5 years, but you are applying to a job in human services, how can you connect the experience to what the employer needs? You don’t want to just list the tasks you performed working in food services, and expect the employer to consider how those tasks have prepared you for a human services role. You make it relevant to the employer by focusing on the transferable skills gained and describing how you would use them in the new position. Instead of saying “Took food and beverage orders and served to customers” on your resume, focus on the transferable skill, which in this case would be customer service and interpersonal skills. Instead, you could say “Provided professional and respectful customer service while utilizing strong interpersonal skills to establish a positive rapport with clients”. The first example lists duties, whereas the second example highlights the skills gained through the performance of those duties, but in a way that is beneficial in the human services environment.

When emailing or communicating with employers, use professional terminology and proper business etiquette. Do not just email an attachment to an employer, without stating in the email what your purpose of contacting them is. Employers will judge your communication skills based on how you email and contact them, so make a good impression. They may also judge you based on your social media image so ensure you know what your social media accounts are saying about you. In fact, around 3 out of 4 employers state they will use your social media pages to learn more about you in order to gauge whether they want to interview you (Ranosa, 2019). Things that get you disqualified from the running include inappropriate videos, photos or GIFs, information regarding substance use, discrimatory comments, poor communication, bad mouthing companies/employers, etc. Many employers feel your email and social media provide clues on how you will interact with their customers, and whether your image/behaviours will reflect positively or negatively on them as an employer.

The last mode for self-marketing to talk about is interviews. Prepare for an interview by reviewing the job ad and company website to refresh in your mind what they are looking for in a candidate and what is important to them as a company. Be sure to practice answering typical interview questions ahead of time so that the answers will come more naturally to you in an actual interview. Your answers should include examples from past experiences (work, school, volunteer, life in general) that support the skills, competencies, and knowledge you are trying to emphasize. The more relevant examples you have to back up what you say, the stronger your interview will come across. During an interview, try to be aware of your non-verbal cues as well. Constant fidgeting or use of filler words (‘um’, ‘like’ etc) often indicate a lack of confidence. In order to convince an employer that you are the best fit for the job, you need to speak with conviction and demonstrate that you are confident in your ability to fill this role. If you are not convinced, how can they be?

Finally, the last factor we will discuss is support. Before you begin your job search, reach out to the Student Employment and Career Centre. We offer free services to all students and alumni in creating a job search plan, resume and cover letter development, portfolio creation, interview tips, interest and personality assessments, career advising and more. We have numerous tools to support you in your job search ranging from handouts, job posting boards, employer networking events, and career-related software that you can access from home, as well as in-person consultations. For more information, or to arrange an appointment, please call the Advising desk at 403-529-3819. Until then, we wish you all the best in all your new endeavors!

Sources:

Economy, P. (2015, May 5). 11 interesting hiring statistics you should know. Retrieved from Inc. This Morning: https://www.inc.com/peter-economy/19-interesting-hiring-statistics-you-should-know.html

Friedman, A. (2017, February 16). 6 seconds is the average time spent reading a resume. Retrieved from LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/six-seconds-average-time-spent-reading-resume-andrew-j-friedman

Ranosa, R. (2019, October 29). How recruiters check for red flags on social media. Retrieved from Human Resources Director: https://www.hcamag.com/ca/specialization/hr-technology/how-recruiters-check-for-red-flags-on-social-media/189897

Library Gadgets from the Multimedia Zone

You probably know the basics of the library: you can sign out books, you can find a spot to study, you can use the drop-in computers… but did you also know that there is a whole world of multimedia gadgets accessible to you, as a student, with your library card?

What you are about to read is by-no-means a complete list of some of the fun and useful items available for you to sign out at our service desk.

You have now entered… The Multimedia Zone!

Phone Chargers

We’ll admit it. When our phone’s battery is low we get a little freaked out. The laws of the universe clearly state that your phone must die at precisely the moment that is most inconvenient to you. Maybe you’re waiting to hear back about a job interview. Maybe you’re watching the last two minutes of your favourite TV show. Maybe you’ve just told your crush that you’re in love with them and they’ve left you on read. Whatever the reason, your phone will run out of battery in that moment. It’s just a harsh reality.

But at the library, we can help! We have phone chargers of all types available for 4-hour loan periods, allowing you to extend the life of your phone’s battery at least enough for you to get the closure you need.

Photo by Will Porada on Unsplash

Flash Drives

When it comes to final projects, losing your files is the last thing you want to happen. Yes, you saved your stuff on the “Z” drive. Sure, you probably emailed yourself a copy. But what happens when the internet goes down and you can’t access your email? What will you do?!

Avoid this terrifying scenario by signing out one of the flash drives from the library multimedia desk. You can keep it for 24-hours, and know that your files will stay with you wherever you go.

Photo by Brina Blum on Unsplash

Noise-Cancelling Headphones

The Vera Bracken Library:

Spacious and comfortable? Yes!

Staffed with friendly library workers who love to help students? You bet!

A tranquil chamber of silence and solitude? Ummm… not always.

We LOVE the fact that students use the library to do group studying and big collaborative projects, but we know that sometimes you just need some peace and quiet. This is why we offer noise-cancelling headphones, available to sign out at the library multimedia desk! You can borrow these headphones for up to four hours whenever you need a break from the clamor.

Photo by Aiony Haust on Unsplash

Microphones

Testing 1-2. Check. Check.

Microphone on your laptop not working? Need to borrow a handheld for your next club meeting? The library multimedia desk has you covered with microphones of all types, available for you to borrow. Just don’t forget your library card!

Photo by Forja2 Mx on Unsplash

Sewing Machine

You have now reached the weirder part of the list, featuring a couple of items you probably wouldn’t have guessed you could sign out from the library. Imagine yourself with a hole in your favourite pair of jeans or a broken strap on your backpack. What will you do? You didn’t bring a sewing machine with you to college. Who brings a sewing machine to college? [Okay, the author of this blog post totally did bring a sewing machine to college, but that’s irrelevant and beside the point.] The point is: you can sign out a sewing machine from the library!! How cool is that? Sign it out and fix your broken stuff or sew matching pyjamas for you and all of your roommates. Get creative (literally)!

Photo by Juan Jose Porta on Unsplash

Electronic Keyboard

There is a quote by Albert Schweitzer that I love:

“There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.”

Now, I don’t mean to say that midterm exams are “miseries” exactly, but let’s be honest. A refuge from midterms would be nice. Unfortunately you can’t have cats in your dorm, but you can have music! In fact, you can make your own music with a keyboard signed out from the library. We even have books to get you started if you want to learn to play! Come sign it out and begin your new life as a rock/pop/EDM/classical virtuoso.

Photo by Martin Hexeberg on Unsplash

Were you surprised by any of these? Have any suggestions for other neat things you’d like to see offered by the library? Let us know at the desk, and come check some of our cool gadgets out!

Open Education Week 2020

This year, Open Education Week is March 2-6. Over 6450 participants across 123 countries contributed to Open Education Week in 2019.  Celebrate this year by checking out one of the many free online events being hosted by institutions around the world.

Open educational resources are meant to make education more accessible and reduce potential barriers to education caused by cost and accessibility. Open education can be delivered in a variety of ways, including open and accessible online courses, open and free digitized textbooks, or openly licensed materials that can be found online (like images, infographics, and other media) that can be used in assignments and classes.

Many instructors at MHC have already adopted open textbooks and material for use in their classes; this could take the form of a printed book available in the bookstore or a pdf or link on your course’s blackboard page.

If you want to find out more about OER, how it’s used at MHC, and where to find more resources, check out the Library’s Open Educational Resource Guide.

Freedom to Read Week

Yesterday marked the official start of Freedom to Read Week- running from February 23-29!

This may have you wondering- what is this week for? After all, it seems like it would be a pretty rare thing to hear someone tell you NOT to read.

However, Freedom to Read Week isn’t really about being stopped from reading. It’s actually to bring awareness to the limiting of reading options available to us, often without us even being aware of it.

I hate to break the hard news: censorship and the banishment of books is still -somehow- a thing that happens all over the world. 


Figure 1. Outdoor reader; female (Pixabay, 2016)

Some examples include:
>And Tango Makes Three, By Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell was removed from a Calgary elementary school library shelf in 2017 for the “theme of homosexual parenting.” (Council, 2020)

(Can be found in our library here: PZ 10.3 R52 2005)

>The Lord of the Rings series, by J.R.R. Tolkien was burned in New Mexico in 2001 for being “satanic” (Association, Banned & Challenged Classics, 2020)

(The prequel to the series, The Hobbit, can be found in our library here: PR 6039 O32 H644 1995)

>The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie was banned and challenged in various locations in 2018 for “sexual references, profanity, violence, gambling, and underage drinking, and for its religious viewpoint” (Association, Top Ten Most Challenged Books Lists, 2020)

(Can be found in our library here: PZ 7 A38 Abs 2007)

>I Am Jazz written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings and illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas
was challenged in various locations in 2017 because it “addresses gender identity.” (Association, Top Ten Most Challenged Books Lists, 2020)

(Can be found in our library here: PZ 7.1.H47 Iam 2014 -2017)


Figure 2. Burnt book pages (Pixabay, 2014)

Books are banned and removed from libraries, bookstores, and publishing every day for reasons that are as vast and unique as we are. Unfortunately, this means there are resources out there that people find themselves unable to access.

Now, this may still seem like something that isn’t really a huge deal, and it may not raise concern for you at all. But it absolutely should. 

The more books and magazines are censored, banned and made difficult to access, the more your rights are restricted. Removing our choice to read something, because certain groups disagree with its opinions or themes, is extremely limiting to every single one of us.

A book can be challenged for religious themes just as often as another book can be challenged for anti-religious themes. And it’s the same story for every topic you can imagine.

Taking resources out of our reach for whatever reason means we lose the opportunity to explore a unique perspective- and authors lose a chance to share their voice. If the only books that are allowed to exist are books that are deemed non-offensive by every single person- we would have no books. There are not many stories (if any) in this world that can be written without offending someone, somewhere.

Figure 3. Pink glasses on open books (Pixabay, 2019)

So with this all in mind I want to encourage you – during this week and always – to read. Read everything that you have an interest in. Read textbooks, and comics, and novels, and magazines, and articles. Soak up every story and opinion and fact that you can and argue when these resources are removed from your reach. Freedom to read is accentuated during this week, but we should fight for it always. More information can be found at https://www.freedomtoread.ca/

Go forth and read, readers. 😊

References

(2014). [Online Image]. Retrieved from Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/photos/book-pages-burnt-burning-old-406806/

(2016). [Online Image]. Retrieved from Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/photos/beautiful-dress-girl-outdoors-1868725/

(2019). [Online Image]. Retrieved from Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/photos/glasses-reading-book-books-focus-4704055/

Association, A. L. (2020). Banned & Challenged Classics. Retrieved from ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics

Association, A. L. (2020). Top Ten Most Challenged Books Lists. Retrieved from ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10

Council, C. B. (2020). Challenged Works. Retrieved from freedom to read: https://www.freedomtoread.ca/challenged-works/

It’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Week!

Having sex? Not having sex? It’s February, the Looooooove month, so lets talk about IT! (; Sexual and Reproductive Health!

We all have to worry about it, and the time to learn more is just around the corner! February 10-14, just in time for Valentine’s Day. We know that when it comes to coitus some people get queasy and some people get giggly. Nevertheless, sex is an important topic. Luckily for you, the SA can help you out!

Let’s talk about sex. [Online Image]. Retrieved from https://www.awarenessdays.com/awareness-days-calendar/sexual-health-week-2020/

What do we mean when we say sexual health? We mean a state of physical, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality- with yourself and/or with others. Let’s be serious for a minute. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences. Free of coercion, discrimination and violence. I mean –> CONSENT <– here, people!! Want it simpler? Watch this Tea consent  or this Cycling through Consent. Yea, they’re pretty obvious and to the point eh? Good. You get it now.

Did you know- thanks to over 30 different bacteria, viruses and parasites- more than 1 million sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are acquired EVERY DAY? STIs can have serious reproductive health consequences beyond the immediate impact of the infection itself (e.g., infertility or mother-to-child transmission). So, if you’re not going to sack it, go home and whack it!

Paterson, Jennifer. (2014, December 2). Thinking about sex [Online Image]. Retrieved from https://radssite.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/thinking-about-sex/

Even if you are not sexually active be sure to still join us in talking about sexual and reproductive health! Learn information on how to ensure you stay healthy in the meantime and once you become sexually active! Sexual health involves more than sexual behaviour. We will have whiteboards placed around the college starting today, February 10th, where you can answer questions and read statistics. Make sure you also check out our sexual health fair on Wednesday February 12th, and you do not want to miss our Naughty Banger Bingo on Thursday February 13th for a chance to win some awesome XXX prizes!

And remember – no glove, no love.

February 5, 2020! Don’t miss out!

What is happening on February 5, 2020? For Medicine Hat College Library, it seems like everything! And we are bringing it all here for you! From a special one time only event to our standard essential for the semester, check out the day we’ve got planned for MHC!

CBC Massey Lecturer, Tanya Talaga, will be speaking at the Eresman Theatre on main campus at 12-1PM. With her books, Seven Fallen Feathers and All my Relations: Finding a Path Forward, this renowned author is one you do not want to miss.

With topics of inter-generational trauma and its affects, the need and path towards finding reconciliation, and so much in between, Tanya Talaga is a dynamic speaker and story-teller, who will spark the discussion in all of us!

Register here today!

Following this special event is another that our college has come to look forward to each semester; Long Night Against Procrastination! LNAP Winter 2020 runs from 5PM until MIDNIGHT, with all the student services brought to you, after hours, to answer the questions you have as a student. It’s ALL-ACCESS till MIDNIGHT!

Focused on academic and mental health, each session and drop-in option is focused on giving/teaching students the resources and skills needed to be the most successful they can be. The night has so much to offer for every individual, whether you are a self-labeled procrastinator or the top of your class, looking for a quick study tip, and brush-up on APA, or an excuse to snuggle a puppy or work on that sun salutation that seems to have escaped progress since the weather turned cold.

Stay on or get back on track with this amazing night!

Pre-registration begins January 27! Find LNAP members at:

  • Monday, January 27 –> Cafeteria
  • Tuesday, January 28 –> B-Wing Hallway
  • Wednesday, January 29 –> Cafeteria
  • Thursday, January 30 –> B-Wing Hallway
  • Friday, January 31 –> Cafeteria
  • Monday, February 3 –> B-Wing Hallway
  • Tuesday, February 4 –> Cafeteria

Or, pre-register online, and check out the schedule to see what you are most interested in! Five sessions will be streaming to Brooks Campus, so all of our students can take part in the night’s events!

Get excited! With 10 days left, the count down is officially on!!

Because the Library is a Space for Everyone

On January 2nd, 2020 we launched our Because the Library is a Space for Everyone initiative. This statement is built out of our Library’s shared values of caring and respect, opening Library up as a place for anyone, for everyone, to find something they can take part in!

Whether hunkering down to study in one of our quiet spaces or our silent space in the room towards the back of the library, or looking to socialize and group work in our collaborative study spaces, or just looking to start a new interest by picking up a new book or tinkering with a new technology, we have the space for you!

From January 2nd through till February 7th, 2020, we are focusing the spotlight on you, the learner. Follow us on instagram @mhclibrary, take a selfie of yourself enjoying the Library and tag us to be entered in to win a gift card to the bookstore. We want to see what you value about the space, what you love most about the Library, and what you want to see more of!

And while we are talking about creating a welcoming environment for all, lets chat about another initiative, Food for Fines, happening from January 2nd through till February 7th.

Photo by edwin josé vega ramos on Pexels.com

During this month long period, Library will offer the ability to pay for overdue fines with non-perishable food items. One item will equal $5.00 worth of overdue fines, and up to a maximum of $25.00 in overdue fines, per person, can be waived this way! All donations will be going to our SA’s Food Pantry, helping to assist students through the tough few months of Winter Semester.

Photo by Malte Lu on Pexels.com

For more details on either initiative, come to the Library and talk to one of our lovely staff members. We can’t wait to see you!

Welcome Back Y’all!

Aaaaand we’re back! A little bit groggy and nostalgic about leaving behind a sense of holiday freedom, but happy to re-establish a new and healthy routine! Let’s face it, those sweets and savories gave us more than a few ideas for New Year’s resolutions. But every year it’s the same song and dance, after a few weeks we are suddenly unmotivated and can’t seem to hop back into the motivation station. The trick is finding something simple that we can maintain to get us on track this New Year. Come check out the SA Office, we are here to help with just that!

Quickmemes. (n.d.). One does not simply keep their New Year’s resolutions [Online Image]. Retrieved from https://sayingimages.com/new-years-resolution-meme/

In our SA office we are all about YOU, the students! Need a hand navigating the college campus? We can direct you. Want to find out about services offered on campus and from us? We can tell you. Want to know quiet places to study alone or communal places to hang out? We have answers. Need to rent a locker? We are happy to help. Curious about the Health and Dental Plan? We offer that!  OR do you just want a bit of down time and a puzzle or coloring sheet? We have those too.

Imgflip. (2017). Buddy the Elf meme [Online Image]. Retrieved from https://imgflip.com/i/2037pi

We’ll be hanging out. Every day. In F113. Across from Crave.

Fall 2019 Extended Hours

Finals are here! Whether you are studying for the big final, or working on your last assignment or paper for your class, the Library is here for you!

Photo by Luriko Yamaguchi on Pexels.com

On Sundays in December, Vera Bracken Library will be staying open an extra two hours! Come spend some time from 1:00PM to 10:00PM on:

  • December 1
  • December 8
  • December 15

Still need a spot outside of the Vera Bracken Library’s regular and extended hours? Check out our blog post about Places to Study Outside of the Library! Each space is specially rated to address the biggest standard needs of students. Judge and choose for yourself the best option to fit you.

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile on Pexels.com

International Education Week!

International Education Week (IEW) is celebrated by over 100 different countries on the third week of November.

This year MHC has planned a host of events to follow in the last week of November to celebrate IEW .

The purpose of IEW is to highlight programs and activities on campus that have an international component and opportunities for community collaboration. Visit https://www.alberta.ca/international-education-week.aspx for more information!

So far for this year we have the following planned:

  • November 23 – ‘Korea Night’ – will be hosted at the student residence community room, organized and hosted by the SA Diversity Club (TENTATIVE)
  • November 25 – ‘Celebration of Colors’, 4:30pm – 6:30pm in the Crowfoot Room –An awareness event around India and Indian culture. Join our students in an opportunity to share their culture over dinner, music and presentations. Ticketed event $12 each.  
  • November 26 – ‘Open Dialogue: Culture Exchange’ in the glass enclosure in the Vera Bracken Library  – Anonymous questions boxes will be set up around campus in November, students staff and faculty can submit questions they have related to cultural diversity on campus and in the community in the box. The questions will be discussed on November 26 a the informal session, all are welcome.
  • November 27 – ‘Wellness Wednesdays, what does mental health look like/mean to you?’ in the cafeteria hallway – We will be asking students, both international and domestic to answer this question. The idea is to get a range of responses to show the diverse responses from students across campus.
  • November 25 – 29 “refuge Canada Display, in the Cuboid – In Partnership with the Esplanade and Refuge Canada we will have an interactive raft display on campus to promote the Refuge Canada exhibition.

Needing more outside this week of events? Let’s talk about the International Resource Room!

Are you an international student who sometimes feels like this?

…but you want to feel like this?

International students studying in Canada face many challenges. Our goal in the International Resource Room is to help international students in mainstream programming succeed in their new educational environment. In order to support students on this journey, we’re available Monday to Friday from 8:30 – 3:30 in B368. In addition to the drop-in service, we offer sessions to help you take your studies to the next level. Topics include:  

  • Organizing a paragraph
  • Introductions and Conclusions
  • Sentence Structure
  • Studying and Test Taking Tips
  • APA
  • Planning assignments

Be sure to come up to the third floor above the library to room B368 and say hello!