Celebrating Amazing Women for International Women’s Day

output_oy8q5n

GIF via: Boutte, Angele Young. “International Women’s Day.” Secondlineblog. 8 March 2018. Retrieved on 01 March 2019 from: https://secondlineblog.org/2018/03/international-womens-day/

Inspirational people come in all shapes, sizes and genders – but with International Women’s Day coming up on March 8th, 2019 we want to help illuminate the glories of women past, present and future.

With the theme of #BalanceforBetter, this year’s IWD2019 is all about celebrating women’s achievements throughout history while calling for a more equal world at the same time. To join in on the festivities, we at the SAMHC office will be hosting an interactive display designed to revel in the wonder of the incredible women at Medicine Hat College and beyond!

Running for a three-day blitz from March 6th to March 8th,  our display will take students, staff and faculty on a historical journey through the eyes of the women who helped write the pages of history. Alongside the archival anecdotes of some of the most influential ladies that have walked the planet, we will have space for those on campus to write the praises for the women in their present lives that share their light, joy, strength and bravery daily.

Everyone is welcome and we hope that together we can create change to make a world that is balanced for the better!

 

 

 

Open Education Week

Open Education Week runs March 4-8, 2019, celebrate by learning about open educational resources! Keep reading and then check out one of the many free online events being offered this year.

What is the Open Education Movement?

The Open Education Movement has one simple goal: to reduce potential barriers to education through cost, increased accessibility, and distribution methods. Open Educational Resources are a key component to that movement, as these resources aim to replace cost prohibitive textbooks and other resources which students are often required to purchase.

 

What is an OER?

Perhaps the best definition of OER comes from the OER Commons:

“Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that you may freely use and reuse at no cost. Unlike fixed, copyrighted resources, OER have been authored or created by an individual or organization that chooses to retain few, if any, ownership rights. In some cases, that means you can download a resource and share it with colleagues and students. In other cases, you may be able to download a resource, edit it in some way, and then re-post it as a remixed work.” ~ OER Commons

 

What is not an OER?

Anything that has a restrictive license agreement or terms of use is not an OER. For instance, most of your institutional library materials are not freely open, cannot be remixed or altered, and cannot be redistributed. These materials require special permission from the rights holder and therefore cannot be distributed openly.

 

Adapted from: McNutt, K. (2016). OER Champion’s Toolkit. Retrieved from: www.albertaoer.com under a CC-BY Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

OER’s at MHC

A number of MHC faculty members have already adopted OER’s for use in their classroom. Here’s just a few of the “free” and open texts used on campus this year.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Freedom To Read Week!

Freedom to read week is upon us! But what does that really mean? This exciting annual event is focused on reminding us that, as Canadians and those living in Canada, we have the freedom to read what we want, when we want! And that is something to get excited for!

white paper with yeah signage
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

 Put on by the Canadian freedom of expression committee, Canada Freedom to Read is all about celebrating the books the have been challenged and/or banned. The big question the week poses for everyone is why were these books challenged and/or banned in the first place? Was it legitimate or illegitimate? Even regular books, ones you grew up loving or we`re recently introduced to by family or friends, might have been banned, including:

  • To kill a mockingbird- Harper Lee
  • Harry Potter- JK Rowling`s
  • The Golden Compass- Philip Pullman
  • The Kite Runner- Khaled Hosseini
  • Habibi- Craig Thompson
  • Looking for Alaska- John Green
  • Captain Underpants- Dav Pikey
  • Hunger Ganes- Suzanne Collins
  • Bone- Jeff Smith
  • The Glass Castle- Jeanette Walls
  • Uncle Bobbys Wedding- Sarah S Brennan
  • The Earth, My butt and other big round things- Carolyn Macker
pile of covered books
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Freedom to read week is centered on the question that while any book can be challenged for any number of reasons (offensive language, mature or graphic content, differences in ideological, theological or political positions and alternative perspectives), who has the right to stop you from reading? Though we enjoy the right year round, this week is about appreciating that even though a person disagrees with a book you are still entitled to read it! Sadly, there is a very long list of books that have been banned. Lucky for us, we have ability to read them if we want! So we took a look at the list and pick out some titles for your growing stack of TBR (to be read)!

woman reading a book
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

While there`s certainly no shortage of Challenged and banned books to choose from– The ALA releases a list of the top 10 most challenged books each years and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund maintains a list of challenged comics  –the following titles have been banned by various school and libraries across North America. (Bennett, 2018, Para 7)

11 Banned books that CBC Recommends

https://www.cbc.ca/books/11-canadian-books-that-have-been-challenged-1.4311368

EPL great article about Banned books

https://www.epl.ca/blogs/post/banned-books/EPL

Sources Cited

Bennett, M (2018, February 8). 7 Books You Never Knew Were Banned [Web log post] Retrived from https://www.epl.ca/blogs/post/banned-books/

Got the summer job search woes? Read this.

Looking for summer work is often the last thing students want to think about in February. At this point in the semester, students are often tired, overwhelmed, and let’s be real…they are just focused on making it through a day of classes without relying on copious amounts of coffee and just dreaming of when they can catch up on their sleep again.

And why think about summer work now anyway? That’s months away, right? Yes, the last day of classes is still 9 weeks away, BUT did you know that most summer student jobs are advertised with closing dates in January and February? So the earlier students start their job search, the more options they will have for finding the job that suits them best!

And that’s where the Student Employment & Career Centre comes in. We understand how busy students are. And we also know that the job search process can be truly intimidating. Trying to figure out just what it is that an employer wants can feel as complicated as the hardest homework assignment ever given. But it doesn’t have to be complicated. Our office has the privilege of working with between 200 – 300 employers during each academic year, and we host numerous student events to try to bring students and employers together. Our goal is take some of the stress off of students by demystifying this process and helping students make connections with employers.

One way we do this is through events like the Community Job Fair, which takes place on Wednesday, February 6th from 10am – 3pm in our Centennial Hall and B-wing hallway. This event will bring more than 40 employers on campus to highlight their job opportunities ranging from summer jobs to permanent career positions. These employers represent a variety of industries so there really is something that could appeal to all students.

The Community Job Fair serves as a great opportunity for students to get some one-on-one time with employers and learn what they can do to make their applications stand out from other jobseekers. There are some steps students can take to enhance their job fair experience:

  • Practice an introduction – knowing how to network effectively begins with the ability to greet someone and share appropriate and relevant information.
  • Dress appropriately on event day – this is an opportunity to make a great first impression on an employer.
  • Visit as many booths as possible – learn about the organizations in attendance, what they do, and the types of career pathways they offer (students are often surprised to learn about the different ways their diploma/certificate can be used in industries that don’t seem directly related). Plus it is a great way to practice networking and interacting with employers.
  • Be professional and courteous – be positive, enthusiastic, and genuinely interested when meeting employers. Don’t just load up on swag and giveaways without asking employers some questions about their industry and organization.
  • Follow through – after finding opportunities of interest, meet with the Student Employment & Career Centre to get assistance with customizing resumes and cover letters, job search strategies, as well as practicing interview skills. This is a free service for all students.

Meeting employers does not have to be intimidating or feel overwhelming. The more prepared students are in knowing what to expect and how to present the best versions of themselves, the better those interactions will be. The Student Employment & Career Centre is located in centre core, across from Registration. Stop by to learn about the ways we support students in reaching their career and employment goals.

LNAP WINTER 2019

LNAP is coming to MHC on February 13, 2019, and there is so much to be excited for!

But what is it?

LNAP stands for Long Night Against Procrastination, and this semester it is coming to MHC on February 13, 2019!

Once a semester we plan a night to bring you the services we you need at times they normally are not available at. After hours!

man in red crew neck sweatshirt photography
Photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com

Who is it for?

LNAP is planned with MHC students in mind! All of this is for you!

When is it?

Winter 2019 LNAP is taking place on Wednesday, February 13th from 5 pm. to midnight.

What can I expect?

  • You can expect an exciting, welcoming atmosphere
  • You can expect quick half hour (or less) workshops filled with all kinds of activities
  • You can expect mental health stress reliefs (hint:  puppies and kitties, and Zen Zone)
  • You can expect snacks and drinks (another hint:  pizza and coffee)
  • You can expect assistance and guidance from Faculty, all staff including Advising, Library, IT, Peer Support, Writing Specialist, tutors in the ARC, Counselors and more
adult african american woman business businessmen
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

What do I need to do?

  • Register now at LNAP Pre-Registration or register in person starting February 4 in the cafeteria or B-wing hallway (location changes depending on the day)
  • Bring your student ID card
  • Arrive at 5, ready to make the most of an amazing night!

We’ll be there, and we are excited to see you there too!  Participate in all the workshops, or only a few for some well-deserved breaks, or just hunker down to get your assignments and studying done.  What the night is really is up to you!

photo of a woman holding an ipad
Photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com

Bell Let’s Talk Day – A Springboard for Mental Health Awareness

bellletstalkThere’s no doubt about it – talking about mental health can be hard! Sometimes unsure of where to start or what to say, people take the easiest road out and say nothing at all. Luckily, there’s an easy way to start changing this unfortunate turn of events and it’s all thanks to Bell Let’s Talk Day – happening this Wednesday, January 30th, 2019!

With the advent of Bell Let’s Talk Day in 2011, we’ve been able to open the doors to an easy conversation all about mental health. And, while talking about mental health is what Bell Let’s Talk is all about, it begs the question of how do we keep the momentum going year round?

Fortunately, with this year’s poster, Bell has us covered once again! Keep reading to discover how you can #endthestigma!

bellelts

“Get Help.” Bell Let’s Talk, letstalk.bell.ca/en/get-help. Accessed January 28, 2019.

 

1. Language Matters – Take a minute and reflect on what your word choices are. Is there a better way to say something than “crazy?” Words can hurt, be mindful of your choices!

2. Be Kind – Everyone can be fighting a hard battle, and we may not get to know what that battle is. So be kind to others and to yourself.

3. Educate Yourself – There’s a lot of information out there about mental health and mental illness. Sleuth through it and get the facts so you can go forward, armed with knowledge!

4. Listen and Ask – Did you know that we can all talk about mental health? All we have to do is ask non-judgemental questions and actively listen to those around us. Mind blowing isn’t it? ;D

5. Talk About It – Now that you’re following all the other 4 steps as outlined above, it’s time to really break down the stigma and talk about what’s going on with your mental health. Be an advocate. Get out there and let the truth be known – we all have struggles, we all have mental health and we can all make a difference by joining the conversation!

 

 

Accessing Your Library Account

What can I do with my MHC library account?

There are so many areas within the MHC library account that give you, the student, the ability to maintain your account details yourself.

When searching the library catalogue, you can place holds on items to pick up at a later date or you can save your searches by maintaining personal lists. When items are checked out to your account, you can view/renew those items by logging in. You can also view any library fines that may be accruing.

Be sure to keep an eye on your MHC email account. This email is attached to your library account, and is where you will receive system generated reminders and notices regarding fines, due dates, and hold notifications.

Click here for more information to help with accessing your library account.

rowdy id jpg