International Women’s Day

March 8, 2019 is International Women’s Day.  It is a day when we celebrate all that women have accomplished and is an important day for the women’s rights movement. The 2019 campaign theme is balance, specifically gender balance, and people are encouraged to take a picture facing the camera with arms bent, palms facing up and posting it to the hashtag #BalanceforBetter.

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The Library has many books on the women’s movement.  Here are a few that can help you celebrate International Women’s Day.

Women in science:  50 fearless pioneers who changed the world by Rachel Ignotofsky.  Q 141 I33 2016

Women who dig:  farming, feminism, and the fight to feed the world by Trina Moyles and K.J. Dakin.  HD 6077 M69 2018

The glass ceiling in the 21st century:  understanding barriers to gender equality by Manuela da Costa Barreto, Michelle K. Ryan and Michael T. Schmitt   HD 6060 G63 2009

Malala’s magic pencil by Malala Yousafzai   LC 2330 Y6825 2017

I can be anything!:  don’t tell me I can’t by Diane Dillon   PZ 7 D57917 Iak 2018

 

Open Education Week

Open Education Week runs March 4-8, 2019, celebrate by learning about open educational resources! Keep reading and then check out one of the many free online events being offered this year.

What is the Open Education Movement?

The Open Education Movement has one simple goal: to reduce potential barriers to education through cost, increased accessibility, and distribution methods. Open Educational Resources are a key component to that movement, as these resources aim to replace cost prohibitive textbooks and other resources which students are often required to purchase.

 

What is an OER?

Perhaps the best definition of OER comes from the OER Commons:

“Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that you may freely use and reuse at no cost. Unlike fixed, copyrighted resources, OER have been authored or created by an individual or organization that chooses to retain few, if any, ownership rights. In some cases, that means you can download a resource and share it with colleagues and students. In other cases, you may be able to download a resource, edit it in some way, and then re-post it as a remixed work.” ~ OER Commons

 

What is not an OER?

Anything that has a restrictive license agreement or terms of use is not an OER. For instance, most of your institutional library materials are not freely open, cannot be remixed or altered, and cannot be redistributed. These materials require special permission from the rights holder and therefore cannot be distributed openly.

 

Adapted from: McNutt, K. (2016). OER Champion’s Toolkit. Retrieved from: www.albertaoer.com under a CC-BY Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

OER’s at MHC

A number of MHC faculty members have already adopted OER’s for use in their classroom. Here’s just a few of the “free” and open texts used on campus this year.

 

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Freedom To Read Week!

Freedom to read week is upon us! But what does that really mean? This exciting annual event is focused on reminding us that, as Canadians and those living in Canada, we have the freedom to read what we want, when we want! And that is something to get excited for!

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 Put on by the Canadian freedom of expression committee, Canada Freedom to Read is all about celebrating the books the have been challenged and/or banned. The big question the week poses for everyone is why were these books challenged and/or banned in the first place? Was it legitimate or illegitimate? Even regular books, ones you grew up loving or we`re recently introduced to by family or friends, might have been banned, including:

  • To kill a mockingbird- Harper Lee
  • Harry Potter- JK Rowling`s
  • The Golden Compass- Philip Pullman
  • The Kite Runner- Khaled Hosseini
  • Habibi- Craig Thompson
  • Looking for Alaska- John Green
  • Captain Underpants- Dav Pikey
  • Hunger Ganes- Suzanne Collins
  • Bone- Jeff Smith
  • The Glass Castle- Jeanette Walls
  • Uncle Bobbys Wedding- Sarah S Brennan
  • The Earth, My butt and other big round things- Carolyn Macker
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Freedom to read week is centered on the question that while any book can be challenged for any number of reasons (offensive language, mature or graphic content, differences in ideological, theological or political positions and alternative perspectives), who has the right to stop you from reading? Though we enjoy the right year round, this week is about appreciating that even though a person disagrees with a book you are still entitled to read it! Sadly, there is a very long list of books that have been banned. Lucky for us, we have ability to read them if we want! So we took a look at the list and pick out some titles for your growing stack of TBR (to be read)!

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While there`s certainly no shortage of Challenged and banned books to choose from– The ALA releases a list of the top 10 most challenged books each years and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund maintains a list of challenged comics  –the following titles have been banned by various school and libraries across North America. (Bennett, 2018, Para 7)

11 Banned books that CBC Recommends

https://www.cbc.ca/books/11-canadian-books-that-have-been-challenged-1.4311368

EPL great article about Banned books

https://www.epl.ca/blogs/post/banned-books/EPL

Sources Cited

Bennett, M (2018, February 8). 7 Books You Never Knew Were Banned [Web log post] Retrived from https://www.epl.ca/blogs/post/banned-books/

Tips for Making the Most of Reading Week

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Have you considered any plans for reading week? Many students are looking forward to a much-needed break, but may not have considered how they will spend their time.  In order to make the most of the break, consider setting some goals based on how you want to feel when you return for the second half of the semester. If you want to come back feeling relaxed, productive, confident and fulfilled, consider these tips:

  1. Get Clarity – Leading up to the break, you likely had a lot on your plate, and there is likely more for you to do upon your return.   Do a mind dump and write everything down that is on your mind. Get clear on what you have accomplished leading up to the break and what is expected of you after the break. Review your course outlines to see what you have already covered and what is yet to come in each class.   This will help you gain a sense of control after a busy few weeks and will allow you to prepare for the second half of the semester.
  2. Rejuvenate –  Although reading week is a prime opportunity to get caught up on your course work, successful students take time out to rest their bodies and minds.  Catch up on sleep, plan healthy meals, spend time with family and friends, be active and get some “me” time.  Allowing the time for self-care over the break will lead to a clear mind and healthy body and will help you relax and be productive.
  3. Summer Job Search – If you are planning to attain summer work, consider updating your resume and applying for potential jobs.  Employers are already looking for students to fill summer positions, and this will allow you to get a head start on being a successful candidate without the pressures of school.
  4. Block Your Time – Reading week will give you the chance to have some free time and catch up, however the disrupted schedule can lead to distraction.  Be mindful of blocking time for what you want to accomplish and go about your days with intention.  Without blocking your time, you may get caught in distraction and before you know it the week will be over.  Plan catch up time during your most productive part of the day and “me” time for other parts of the day so you can end your week feeling relaxed, productive, confident and fulfilled.

LNAP WINTER 2019

LNAP is coming to MHC on February 13, 2019, and there is so much to be excited for!

But what is it?

LNAP stands for Long Night Against Procrastination, and this semester it is coming to MHC on February 13, 2019!

Once a semester we plan a night to bring you the services we you need at times they normally are not available at. After hours!

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Who is it for?

LNAP is planned with MHC students in mind! All of this is for you!

When is it?

Winter 2019 LNAP is taking place on Wednesday, February 13th from 5 pm. to midnight.

What can I expect?

  • You can expect an exciting, welcoming atmosphere
  • You can expect quick half hour (or less) workshops filled with all kinds of activities
  • You can expect mental health stress reliefs (hint:  puppies and kitties, and Zen Zone)
  • You can expect snacks and drinks (another hint:  pizza and coffee)
  • You can expect assistance and guidance from Faculty, all staff including Advising, Library, IT, Peer Support, Writing Specialist, tutors in the ARC, Counselors and more
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What do I need to do?

  • Register now at LNAP Pre-Registration or register in person starting February 4 in the cafeteria or B-wing hallway (location changes depending on the day)
  • Bring your student ID card
  • Arrive at 5, ready to make the most of an amazing night!

We’ll be there, and we are excited to see you there too!  Participate in all the workshops, or only a few for some well-deserved breaks, or just hunker down to get your assignments and studying done.  What the night is really is up to you!

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Bell Let’s Talk Day – A Springboard for Mental Health Awareness

bellletstalkThere’s no doubt about it – talking about mental health can be hard! Sometimes unsure of where to start or what to say, people take the easiest road out and say nothing at all. Luckily, there’s an easy way to start changing this unfortunate turn of events and it’s all thanks to Bell Let’s Talk Day – happening this Wednesday, January 30th, 2019!

With the advent of Bell Let’s Talk Day in 2011, we’ve been able to open the doors to an easy conversation all about mental health. And, while talking about mental health is what Bell Let’s Talk is all about, it begs the question of how do we keep the momentum going year round?

Fortunately, with this year’s poster, Bell has us covered once again! Keep reading to discover how you can #endthestigma!

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“Get Help.” Bell Let’s Talk, letstalk.bell.ca/en/get-help. Accessed January 28, 2019.

 

1. Language Matters – Take a minute and reflect on what your word choices are. Is there a better way to say something than “crazy?” Words can hurt, be mindful of your choices!

2. Be Kind – Everyone can be fighting a hard battle, and we may not get to know what that battle is. So be kind to others and to yourself.

3. Educate Yourself – There’s a lot of information out there about mental health and mental illness. Sleuth through it and get the facts so you can go forward, armed with knowledge!

4. Listen and Ask – Did you know that we can all talk about mental health? All we have to do is ask non-judgemental questions and actively listen to those around us. Mind blowing isn’t it? ;D

5. Talk About It – Now that you’re following all the other 4 steps as outlined above, it’s time to really break down the stigma and talk about what’s going on with your mental health. Be an advocate. Get out there and let the truth be known – we all have struggles, we all have mental health and we can all make a difference by joining the conversation!

 

 

Welcome back!

Welcome back for winter term, MHC students! Hope you all had a wonderful, restful holiday and have recovered from fall term enough to do it all over again!

New students- don’t forget to come by and grab your ID card.

Returning students- come by and see us! You can enter our ramen noodle raffle, browse our New Book display, and check out the Student Success Centre.

It’s a whole new term- go get it!