It’s the Final Countdown!

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Welcome to April, and the last month of classes! Here in the Library, we know how busy and stressful the next month can be for everyone, with studying, final projects, etc. So, we decided to compile a list, full of suggestions from all the Library staff, in order to help all the learners at MHC along with their “end of the semester” studying!

Don’t worry: in honor of National Humor Month, and April Fools Day, this post will be full of jokes! As they say, a joke that helps with your studies is an e-joke-cational one!

try these tips:
  • Find a quiet place to study–too much noise might keep you distracted (noise cancelling headphones work too!)
  • Make sure you have ample lighting; it might leave you and your studies in the dark if you don’t
  • Take breaks if you need them; don’t overwhelm yourself
  • Stay hydrated, or else you might wash away your chances of a good grade
  • Remember to have a snack! Little pieces of chocolate or candy work well as the sugar and caffeine content will give your brain a little pick-me-up, which makes studying all the sweeter
  • Work on one class at a time, because jumping from subject to subject might confuse you
  • Save your notes, studying tools, or projects frequently if you’re working on a computer, otherwise you may lose the drive to keep studying
  • Repetition. Write it over, write it over, and say it out loud! Repetition can help the knowledge stick in your brain and make it easier to recall during your exams
  • Study with a friend! You can keep yourselves accountable, and bounce more study ideas and tips off of each other!
  • Make a schedule or a time table. This will help you budget your time for each subject more efficiently, and help you better understand and see how much progress you’re making. That way you won’t be overdue on anything
  • Triage your academic priorities! Knowing which classes and projects should be at the top of your list is important, so you know where you should be focusing all of your energy

We here at the Library have quite a few ways to help you with your technological studying needs too! We have a variety of multimedia resources for you to sign out, such a USB drives, headphones, therapy light lamps, and more! All you need is your Student ID card!

We also have different spaces within the Library for you study, such as the Computer Lab, the Quiet Study Room, and the Group Study Rooms. The Computer Lab has access to two scanners for you to scan your notes electronically, and The Quiet Study Room is for those learners who just need peace and quiet while they work! The Group Study Rooms are certainly better for a crowd, with room for up to four people! You can book the Group Study Rooms in advance for up to two hours at the bottom of our Library website! Or, you can click this link and get right to the booking page: https://outlook.office365.com/owa/calendar/GroupStudyRooms@mhc.ab.ca/bookings/

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If you’re looking for even more information, tips and tricks, you can also take a look at the online recordings of Student Success Sessions! You can find all of the current recordings at https://www.mhc.ab.ca/Services/AcademicSupport/Student-Success-Sessions as well as the calendar for any in person classes that Academic Support is putting on!

If you need more information, or need to ask any questions at all, you can always come see us during our open hours, or contact us via email or phone! And, follow us on social media @mhclibrary for more fun tips and tricks through the last push of the semester!

Happy studying!

What’s a mathematician’s favorite dessert?

Pi.

Women’s History Month 2022

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March is Women’s History Month! This month over our social media, as well as here in the Library, we’ll be showing off some amazing resources that touch on all things Women’s History-—famous inventors, authors, and other women who have made leaps and bounds throughout history, all for the sake of equality.

Women’s History Month started as a small, week long event tied to International Women’s Day (March 8th.) It was lead by Gerda Lerner, who is now known as one of the pioneers of the academic field of women’s history, and began to grow traction when the participants of the event realized how popular it was. Eventually, it was recognized as Women’s History Week in a Californian state in 1978, only to be promoted on a presidential level to National Women’s History Week in 1980. Years passed, and more localities began to have events to commemorate the week, some of them extending through the entire month. As the movement continued to grow, it was only a few years later that the National Women’s History Project petitioned for the month of March to be designated as Women’s History Month. And in 1987, that was exactly what happened!

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Here in Canada, Women’s History Month Canada is in October, and had a very similar beginning. In 1992, October was chosen instead of the traditional March, to coincide with October 18th, the anniversary date of Edwards v. Canada, more commonly known as the Persons Case. The Persons Case was a huge breakthrough in regards to women having the same amount of power in political settings, and set the groundwork for many women who work as government appointed officials. The month of October also coincides with International Day of the Girl, which is a day that is observed by the United Nations to help push and champion girl’s and women’s rights in, but not limited to: education, law, nutrition and healthcare.

Since then, Women’s History Month has been celebrated in many different ways and in many different countries! Conventions, exhibitions, and other activities have been planned all around the world, mostly focusing on a specific theme each year. 2020 was Valiant Women of the Vote, which focuses on the Women’s Suffrage Centennial, in which one hundred years ago women finally got the right to vote in the United States. 2021 was a continuation of that theme, entitled Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced. 2022’s theme is Women Providing Healing, Promoting Hope, with a focus on women in healthcare and healthcare related STEM positions.

Some famous women who invented major technologies in healthcare and STEM related fields include:

  • Virginia Apgar, the inventor the APGAR score for newborn babies
  • Hedy Lamarr, who invented the beginnings of technology that helped create the GPS, Wi-fi, and Bluetooth
  • Ada Lovelace, who is credited with writing the world’s first computer algorithm
  • Letitia Geer, the inventor of the medical syringe that could be used with only one hand
  • Ida Hyde, who while working with cells molecular structures, invented the first micro-electrode
  • Rachel Fuller Brown & Elizabeth Lee Hazen, who both worked together to create one of the first effective anti-fungal drugs
  • Mary Sherman Morgan, who created Hydyne, a type of rocket fuel
  • Stephanie Kwolek, the inventor of the Kevlar fiber which is used in bullet-proof vests
  • Ann Tsukamoto, her work with stem cells lead her to co-patent the process of stem cell isolation
  • Patricia Bath, the first African-American person to receive a patent for a medical purpose, which ended up with the creation of the Laserphaco Probe

There are so many things, from high-powered lasers that are used in eye surgeries, to items we use in everyday life, that we have women to for!

Since there are so many amazing women to celebrate during this month, we here in the Library have put together a few different resources to take a look at too! Below is a book list that is all about women:

Through feminist eyes: essays on Canadian’s women’s history by Joan Sangster — HQ 1453 S17 2011

U.S. women’s history: untangling the threads of sisterhood by Leslie Brown, Jacqueline L Castledine, Anne M Valk — eBook

Becoming by Michelle Obama — E909.O24 A3 2018

Viola Desmond: her life and times by Graham Reynolds, Wanda Robson — FC2346.26 .D48 R49 2018

She persisted around the world: 13 women who changed history by Chelsea Clinton, Alexandra Boiger — 305 Cli

100 more Canadian heroines: famous and forgotten faces by Merna Forster — eBook

The kids book of great Canadian women by Elizabeth MacLeod, John Mantha — 971.009 Mac

Nellie McClung, the complete autobiography: Clearing in the west and the stream runs fast by Nellie L McClung, Veronica Jane Strong-Boag, Michelle Lynn Rosa — PS 8525 C58 Z53 2003

A reconstructed world: a feminist biography of Gertrude Richardson by Barbara Ann Roberts — eBook

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Have a knowledgeable and inspiring Women’s History Month! Check us out @mhclibrary on Instagram for more information and posts!

Happy reading!

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month

https://www.canada.ca/en/women-gender-equality/news/2018/10/womens-history-month.html

https://women-gender-equality.canada.ca/en.html

https://womenshistorymonth.gov/

https://www.womenshistory.org/womens-history/womens-history-month

Academic Awareness Week!

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It’s the first week of February, and welcome to Academic Awareness Week!

While taking classes here at Medicine Hat College, there is an important step to each class you take that you may not even realize you’re doing. It’s in each paper you write, each lecture you attend, and also in each assignment you do. It’s called Academic Awareness, and can sometimes be known as Academic Integrity. It’s the art of knowing how we feel, how we act, and how we respect the knowledge that is being shared within the classes that your professors are teaching. It sounds fairly simple, right? However, there are often small ways that students can be breaking the code of Academic Integrity, which can lead to things such as failed assignments, suspensions, and even legal action. Through the rest of this blog post, I will be going through one of the most important examples of following Academic Awareness: not plagiarizing. I’ll include a few of the key words, phrases, and examples of Academic Awareness, as well as resources for you to go and check out if you’re more interested in the subject!

Academic Awareness is being keenly aware of your honesty and honor when working or engaging in a learning environment. This can range from citations/references of correct sources, crediting others for their work in a group project, and in general, being responsible for your own work and learning adventure. Being an academic learner within MHC is a way for you to create and express your own ideas and engage in discussions to further your learning, but it all needs to be done honestly. That means that you need to reference where referencing is required, follow copyright laws, and most certainly, never cheat on a test or exam, regardless of the scenario. Academic Awareness effects every student, not just the ones that do not follow it. Academic Dishonesty–the opposite of Academic Awareness–not only cheats the person who commits it from learning in an honest and healthy environment, but the other students in the classroom. Sometimes, a student may not even know that they are committing Academic Dishonesty, so it is important to have a good understanding of what you should do so you don’t accidentally do what you shouldn’t.

Plagiarism is one of the biggest problems that we have to face in regards to Academic Dishonesty. Plagiarism can be defined in many different ways, but some of them include the following examples:

  • taking someone else’s words, work, contributions or materials and using them as your own
  • using someone else’s words, work, contributions, or materials and not properly crediting/citing/referencing the author(s)
  • stealing or tweaking someone’s else’s words, work, contributions or materials and using them as your own
  • creating an idea or piece of work that is based off of someone else’s words or work that already exists

Plagiarism is the same as fraud: it is purposefully stealing someone else’s words or work, pretending that it is your own, and once you’ve handed in your assignment or paper, lying about the fact that you were the one that created it. Plagiarism is not just limited to words, books, or ideas; it also includes media, such as music, pictures, movies, etc., which can make assuring that you are not committing plagiarism very challenging at times.

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Luckily, we here in the Library have many amazing resources for Academic Awareness! We have APA, MLA, and Chicago citation guides, located at https://mhc.ab.libguides.com/citation for you to use whenever you may be writing a paper. These guides are to help you understand what sort of information you need to be citing–basically any ideas or phrases that you did not come up with yourself.

We also have our lovely Info Service Staff, who are always able to lend a helping hand for all your referencing needs. Right now, you can find them at the front desk of the Library or through the "Chat" function on our website, http://www.mhc.ab.ca/library, and can be reached Monday-Friday from 8am to 4pm. If you’re writing late at night, and need to send an email before you forget to, you can also reach them at mhclibrary@mhc.ab.ca. If you are specifically concerned with a piece of music, a picture, or any sort of media related item and whether or not it is copyrighted, we also have a Copyright Specialist who will be able to help with that, as well as a copyright guide, found at https://mhc.ab.libguides.com/c.php?g=715484.

We also have a few books available for you to place a hold on. You can find the titles, authors, and call numbers below:

My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture by Susan D. Blume — PN 167 B48 2009

Doing Honest Work in College: How to Prepare Citations, Avoid Plagiarism, and Achieve Real Academic Success by Charles Lipson — PN 171 F56 L56 2008

Cite It Right: the SourceAid Guide to Citation, Research, and Avoiding Plagiarism by Tom Fox, Julia Johns, and Sarah Keller — PN 171 F56 F69 2007

Don’t Steal Copyrighted Stuff!: Avoiding Plagiarism and Illegal Internet Downloading by Ann Gaines — PN 167 G35 2008

Writing Research Papers: A Complete Guide by James D. Lester — LB 2369 .L4 2015

Copyright Infringement by Roman Espejo — KF 3080 C66 2009

Intellectual Property Law: Copyright, Patents, Trade-marks by D. Vaver — KE 2779 .V38 2011

A Research Agenda for Academic Integrity by Tracey Bretag (eBook–search for the title using the search bar on our website!)

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You can find more fun Academic Awareness Week events at the Student’s Association page, found at https://samhc.ca/events/

If you ever have any questions, you can reach us at any of the above chat functions or email addresses, as well as at mhclibrary@mhc.ab.ca. We will do our best to assist!

Happy reading!

Additional Resources:

https://www.plagiarism.org/

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cipointernet-internetopic.nsf/eng/h_wr02281.html

Digital Citizenship

“[A]ny attack on […] the concept of objective truth […] threatens in the long run every department of thought.”

George Orwell; “The Prevention of Literature” (1946)

Photo Credit: Unsplash

“How do I find reliable news online?”

“How do free Apps make money?”

“What’s clickbait?”

If you’ve ever asked yourself these questions, you’re not alone. In the “post-truth” twenty-first century, our information environment is fraught. Controversies concerning “fake news” and the authority of experts shape our daily lives; fringe media attack the validity of democratic processes and COVID-19 disinformation imperils public health. In online life, being popular and getting lots of “views” often feels more important than telling the truth.

All sources—whether reputable or not—can appear equal in the digital sphere. According to W. Lance Bennett and Steven Livingston in their work, The Disinformation Age: Politics, Technology, and Disruptive Communication in the United States (2020):

Democracies around the world face rising levels of disinformation. The intentional spread of falsehoods and related attacks on the rights of minorities, press freedoms, and the rule of law all challenge the basic norms and values on which institutional legitimacy and political stability depend. (p. xv)

The Internet’s business model heavily contributes to the flow of disinformation. Most search engines and social media platforms rely on advertising in order to make money. They sell users’ data–profile information, browsing history, and lists of purchases–to advertisers, who can then target particular groups with marketing content and, in many cases, covertly influence user behaviour. Advertisers want to attach their content to popular websites and videos, and statistics show that polarizing and highly emotional content tends to go viral. Online disinformation gets lots of views, which makes advertisers happy and generates more revenue for technology companies. The result? More disinformation is generated and promoted.

Wondering why you’ve never learned about any of this in school? Well, now you will.

MHC Library Services recently launched the Digital Citizenship Initiative, an instructional program that will help students untangle the social complexities and ethical dilemmas of the digital world. The project educates students on the economics of the Internet and the means by which political bad actors exploit its platforms to pervert the public discourse. Through classroom activities and reference to a wealth of print and audiovisual resources, participants will learn to recognize and counter disinformation and fake news, and understand how social media companies commodify their data. The program is the Library’s contribution to efforts to address the gap in post-secondary instruction concerning the socio-political and economic dimensions of digital existence. Because we all need to know how the online impacts the IRL.

* * *

Want to see some of our resources?

Check out our eBook and video library on the Digital Citizenship website. Or have a look at our some of our handouts, like our Three-Minute Read on Conspiracy Theories.

Time for Brew Monday! Get your tea steeping and your connection ready!

For those of you who have never heard of Blue Monday, it is supposedly the most depressing day of the year, occurring on the third Monday in January. What a lot of people don’t know about Blue Monday is that the man who coined the term, and did the research to narrow down this exact date, never intended for the day to become negative. It was actually identified with the intention to encourage people to take the time to find the positives in the “gloomiest day of the year” and remember that the beginning of a new year is a wonderful time to begin other things too; it’s an opportunity for change and fresh starts (Peat, 2018).

(Altman, 2018)

We all know 2020 was a weird year. And 2021 is off to an odd start too- but I promise I’m not here to tell you these are “unprecedented times.” You know they are, you’re living them! I AM here to tell you that just because things are strange right now, different from what we have come to expect out of our day-to-day, doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the college experience of community… it just means we have an opportunity to get a bit creative in how we enjoy these experiences. And what better time to get creative in finding a little spot of happy than Blue Monday?

Since we can’t enjoy the fresh beginning of meeting new people around campus the way we could other years we are bringing it online with “Brew Monday”.

“Brew Monday” is a play on the term “Blue Monday”, which occurs on January 18th this year. It is a chance to connect MHC students with each other! And maybe an excuse to drink more tea/coffee… (haha- BREW Monday, get it?)

(Stokpic, 2014)

Sooooo… what exactly happens? On Monday, January 18, from 11 AM – 2 PM, virtual rooms will be set up via Blackboard Collaborate, each dedicated to a special interest or topic. All you need to do is find access to a computer or laptop with webcam and microphone capabilities where you can open Blackboard Collaborate. Then make your favourite tea or coffee, and come back here to the Chapter One Blog! A list of topics and meeting rooms will be posted and you can select your connection!

Together let’s make Blue Monday a little less blue 😊 and all about creating more connections! We hope to see you there! Find your connection points and times below!

JANUARY 18 @TOPICS & INTERESTS
11:00AM-NOONMature Student Experience And Parenting
NOON-12:30PMBaking! Because Who Doesn’t Love Food!
NOON-1:00PMCatching Up With All Things True Crime
NOON-1:00PMFinding New Worlds To Explore In Books And Movies
1:00PM-2:00PMDogs, Dogs, And More Dogs! Bring Your Dog!
1:00PM-2:00PMGet Lost In The Fun Of Board Games And Card Games
1:00PM-2:00PMPositivity, Focus, And Making Your Beveridge Work For YOU!

References

Altman, G. (2018, March 24). Time for Change. Pixabay. https://pixabay.com/photos/change-new-beginning-risk-road-3256330/

Peat, J. (2018, January 5). Man who coined the term ‘Blue Monday’ apologises for making January more depressing. Retrieved from Independent: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/blue-monday-apology-depressing-january-misey-money-disposable-income-psychology-dr-cliff-arnall-a8143246.html

Stokpic. (2014, October 24). Woman Drinking Coffee. Pixabay. https://pixabay.com/photos/woman-drinking-coffee-person-601568/

You’re invited to LNAP!

LNAP logoWhat is it?

LNAP stands for Long Night Against Procrastination.  Still confused?  One night each semester we bring together all the services that we think will help you succeed as a student here at MHC.  We want to help you avoid procrastination and give you support to start (or finish!) all of your assignments and papers.

Who is it for?

LNAP is a college-wide event for all MHC students.

When is it?

Fall 2018 LNAP is happening Wednesday, October 10th from 5 pm. to midnight.

What can I expect?

  • You can expect a fun, friendly atmosphere
  • You can expect quick workshops filled with all kinds of success strategies
  • You can expect stress release activities (hint:  puppies and kitties)
  • You can expect food and caffeine (another hint:  pizza)
  • You can expect help and support from Faculty, all staff including Advising, Library, IT, Peer Support, Writing Specialist, tutors in the ARC, Counselors and more

What do I need to do?

  • Register now at LNAP Pre-Registration or register in person starting October 1 in the cafeteria or B-wing hallway (location changes depending on the day)
  • Bring your student ID card
  • Arrive at 5 and be ready to become a part of something big!

It’s up to you.  Join in all of the activities or hunker down and get some work done.  It’s all good.  See you there!

Stress Less at MHC

STRESS LESS

It’s a new year and for both our new and returning students, the Fall semester can be a time of challenges and triumphs. To make sure that your year starts off right, we have a few tips from our VP Internal, Evelyn Schottner and our Health and Wellness Coordinator, Jaycene Mock.

Hi Everyone! Evelyn here – I’m your VP Internal. You can come visit me to help with all sorts of academic issues if they arise for you. I’m here to help guide you through academic appeals, discrimination issues, and general student rights. I really believe that the College should be a place where all students feel safe and included, and that’s really what my position — and the Students’ Association in general — is all about! I also want to remind students really quick that there is an important date coming up: November 21st, 2018 is the withdraw date. This means that this is the last day to withdraw from a class and have it show up as a “W” on your transcript instead of a failing grade. I would highly recommend talking to your academic advisor prior to this date to weigh out your options if you have a class or classes that you’re struggling in. Other than that, feel free to pop into the SAMHC office or email me at SA_Internal@mhc.ab.ca with any questions you might have! Have a great year everyone!

Changing gears just a little! Jaycene here, your friendly neighborhood Health and Wellness Coordinator. The Fall semester is just kicking off and already I’ve seen a few very stressed-out students. Taking care of yourself can sometimes fall off to the bottom of your priority list when life gets busy but reminder: self-care should always be a priority! As cheesy as it sound, it’s true that you can’t take care of anything if you have not been taking care of yourself. This looks different for each of us, but below is one of my favorite infographics from the masters at Buzzfeed! If you have anymore questions or need anything, again please feel free to pop into the SAMHC office or email me at SA_HWC@mhc.ab.ca. Also come out to our Stress Less Events on September 11th and 12th in the Den 😀

stressless1

Borges, Anna. “For Making Everyday A Little More Chill.” Buzzfeed. 16 July 2016. Retrieved on 07 September 2018 from: https://www.buzzfeed.com/annaborges/relaxation-charts?utm_term=.gpxXjo1Ne&sub=4308927_9196789