It’s the Final Countdown!

Photo by energepic.com on Pexels.com

Welcome to April, and the last month of classes! Here in the Library, we know how busy and stressful the next month can be for everyone, with studying, final projects, etc. So, we decided to compile a list, full of suggestions from all the Library staff, in order to help all the learners at MHC along with their “end of the semester” studying!

Don’t worry: in honor of National Humor Month, and April Fools Day, this post will be full of jokes! As they say, a joke that helps with your studies is an e-joke-cational one!

try these tips:
  • Find a quiet place to study–too much noise might keep you distracted (noise cancelling headphones work too!)
  • Make sure you have ample lighting; it might leave you and your studies in the dark if you don’t
  • Take breaks if you need them; don’t overwhelm yourself
  • Stay hydrated, or else you might wash away your chances of a good grade
  • Remember to have a snack! Little pieces of chocolate or candy work well as the sugar and caffeine content will give your brain a little pick-me-up, which makes studying all the sweeter
  • Work on one class at a time, because jumping from subject to subject might confuse you
  • Save your notes, studying tools, or projects frequently if you’re working on a computer, otherwise you may lose the drive to keep studying
  • Repetition. Write it over, write it over, and say it out loud! Repetition can help the knowledge stick in your brain and make it easier to recall during your exams
  • Study with a friend! You can keep yourselves accountable, and bounce more study ideas and tips off of each other!
  • Make a schedule or a time table. This will help you budget your time for each subject more efficiently, and help you better understand and see how much progress you’re making. That way you won’t be overdue on anything
  • Triage your academic priorities! Knowing which classes and projects should be at the top of your list is important, so you know where you should be focusing all of your energy

We here at the Library have quite a few ways to help you with your technological studying needs too! We have a variety of multimedia resources for you to sign out, such a USB drives, headphones, therapy light lamps, and more! All you need is your Student ID card!

We also have different spaces within the Library for you study, such as the Computer Lab, the Quiet Study Room, and the Group Study Rooms. The Computer Lab has access to two scanners for you to scan your notes electronically, and The Quiet Study Room is for those learners who just need peace and quiet while they work! The Group Study Rooms are certainly better for a crowd, with room for up to four people! You can book the Group Study Rooms in advance for up to two hours at the bottom of our Library website! Or, you can click this link and get right to the booking page: https://outlook.office365.com/owa/calendar/GroupStudyRooms@mhc.ab.ca/bookings/

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

If you’re looking for even more information, tips and tricks, you can also take a look at the online recordings of Student Success Sessions! You can find all of the current recordings at https://www.mhc.ab.ca/Services/AcademicSupport/Student-Success-Sessions as well as the calendar for any in person classes that Academic Support is putting on!

If you need more information, or need to ask any questions at all, you can always come see us during our open hours, or contact us via email or phone! And, follow us on social media @mhclibrary for more fun tips and tricks through the last push of the semester!

Happy studying!

What’s a mathematician’s favorite dessert?

Pi.

Women’s History Month 2022

Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels.com

March is Women’s History Month! This month over our social media, as well as here in the Library, we’ll be showing off some amazing resources that touch on all things Women’s History-—famous inventors, authors, and other women who have made leaps and bounds throughout history, all for the sake of equality.

Women’s History Month started as a small, week long event tied to International Women’s Day (March 8th.) It was lead by Gerda Lerner, who is now known as one of the pioneers of the academic field of women’s history, and began to grow traction when the participants of the event realized how popular it was. Eventually, it was recognized as Women’s History Week in a Californian state in 1978, only to be promoted on a presidential level to National Women’s History Week in 1980. Years passed, and more localities began to have events to commemorate the week, some of them extending through the entire month. As the movement continued to grow, it was only a few years later that the National Women’s History Project petitioned for the month of March to be designated as Women’s History Month. And in 1987, that was exactly what happened!

Photo by Nicole Berro on Pexels.com

Here in Canada, Women’s History Month Canada is in October, and had a very similar beginning. In 1992, October was chosen instead of the traditional March, to coincide with October 18th, the anniversary date of Edwards v. Canada, more commonly known as the Persons Case. The Persons Case was a huge breakthrough in regards to women having the same amount of power in political settings, and set the groundwork for many women who work as government appointed officials. The month of October also coincides with International Day of the Girl, which is a day that is observed by the United Nations to help push and champion girl’s and women’s rights in, but not limited to: education, law, nutrition and healthcare.

Since then, Women’s History Month has been celebrated in many different ways and in many different countries! Conventions, exhibitions, and other activities have been planned all around the world, mostly focusing on a specific theme each year. 2020 was Valiant Women of the Vote, which focuses on the Women’s Suffrage Centennial, in which one hundred years ago women finally got the right to vote in the United States. 2021 was a continuation of that theme, entitled Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced. 2022’s theme is Women Providing Healing, Promoting Hope, with a focus on women in healthcare and healthcare related STEM positions.

Some famous women who invented major technologies in healthcare and STEM related fields include:

  • Virginia Apgar, the inventor the APGAR score for newborn babies
  • Hedy Lamarr, who invented the beginnings of technology that helped create the GPS, Wi-fi, and Bluetooth
  • Ada Lovelace, who is credited with writing the world’s first computer algorithm
  • Letitia Geer, the inventor of the medical syringe that could be used with only one hand
  • Ida Hyde, who while working with cells molecular structures, invented the first micro-electrode
  • Rachel Fuller Brown & Elizabeth Lee Hazen, who both worked together to create one of the first effective anti-fungal drugs
  • Mary Sherman Morgan, who created Hydyne, a type of rocket fuel
  • Stephanie Kwolek, the inventor of the Kevlar fiber which is used in bullet-proof vests
  • Ann Tsukamoto, her work with stem cells lead her to co-patent the process of stem cell isolation
  • Patricia Bath, the first African-American person to receive a patent for a medical purpose, which ended up with the creation of the Laserphaco Probe

There are so many things, from high-powered lasers that are used in eye surgeries, to items we use in everyday life, that we have women to for!

Since there are so many amazing women to celebrate during this month, we here in the Library have put together a few different resources to take a look at too! Below is a book list that is all about women:

Through feminist eyes: essays on Canadian’s women’s history by Joan Sangster — HQ 1453 S17 2011

U.S. women’s history: untangling the threads of sisterhood by Leslie Brown, Jacqueline L Castledine, Anne M Valk — eBook

Becoming by Michelle Obama — E909.O24 A3 2018

Viola Desmond: her life and times by Graham Reynolds, Wanda Robson — FC2346.26 .D48 R49 2018

She persisted around the world: 13 women who changed history by Chelsea Clinton, Alexandra Boiger — 305 Cli

100 more Canadian heroines: famous and forgotten faces by Merna Forster — eBook

The kids book of great Canadian women by Elizabeth MacLeod, John Mantha — 971.009 Mac

Nellie McClung, the complete autobiography: Clearing in the west and the stream runs fast by Nellie L McClung, Veronica Jane Strong-Boag, Michelle Lynn Rosa — PS 8525 C58 Z53 2003

A reconstructed world: a feminist biography of Gertrude Richardson by Barbara Ann Roberts — eBook

Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

Have a knowledgeable and inspiring Women’s History Month! Check us out @mhclibrary on Instagram for more information and posts!

Happy reading!

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month

https://www.canada.ca/en/women-gender-equality/news/2018/10/womens-history-month.html

https://women-gender-equality.canada.ca/en.html

https://womenshistorymonth.gov/

https://www.womenshistory.org/womens-history/womens-history-month

Academic Awareness Week!

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

It’s the first week of February, and welcome to Academic Awareness Week!

While taking classes here at Medicine Hat College, there is an important step to each class you take that you may not even realize you’re doing. It’s in each paper you write, each lecture you attend, and also in each assignment you do. It’s called Academic Awareness, and can sometimes be known as Academic Integrity. It’s the art of knowing how we feel, how we act, and how we respect the knowledge that is being shared within the classes that your professors are teaching. It sounds fairly simple, right? However, there are often small ways that students can be breaking the code of Academic Integrity, which can lead to things such as failed assignments, suspensions, and even legal action. Through the rest of this blog post, I will be going through one of the most important examples of following Academic Awareness: not plagiarizing. I’ll include a few of the key words, phrases, and examples of Academic Awareness, as well as resources for you to go and check out if you’re more interested in the subject!

Academic Awareness is being keenly aware of your honesty and honor when working or engaging in a learning environment. This can range from citations/references of correct sources, crediting others for their work in a group project, and in general, being responsible for your own work and learning adventure. Being an academic learner within MHC is a way for you to create and express your own ideas and engage in discussions to further your learning, but it all needs to be done honestly. That means that you need to reference where referencing is required, follow copyright laws, and most certainly, never cheat on a test or exam, regardless of the scenario. Academic Awareness effects every student, not just the ones that do not follow it. Academic Dishonesty–the opposite of Academic Awareness–not only cheats the person who commits it from learning in an honest and healthy environment, but the other students in the classroom. Sometimes, a student may not even know that they are committing Academic Dishonesty, so it is important to have a good understanding of what you should do so you don’t accidentally do what you shouldn’t.

Plagiarism is one of the biggest problems that we have to face in regards to Academic Dishonesty. Plagiarism can be defined in many different ways, but some of them include the following examples:

  • taking someone else’s words, work, contributions or materials and using them as your own
  • using someone else’s words, work, contributions, or materials and not properly crediting/citing/referencing the author(s)
  • stealing or tweaking someone’s else’s words, work, contributions or materials and using them as your own
  • creating an idea or piece of work that is based off of someone else’s words or work that already exists

Plagiarism is the same as fraud: it is purposefully stealing someone else’s words or work, pretending that it is your own, and once you’ve handed in your assignment or paper, lying about the fact that you were the one that created it. Plagiarism is not just limited to words, books, or ideas; it also includes media, such as music, pictures, movies, etc., which can make assuring that you are not committing plagiarism very challenging at times.

Photo by Samson Katt on Pexels.com

Luckily, we here in the Library have many amazing resources for Academic Awareness! We have APA, MLA, and Chicago citation guides, located at https://mhc.ab.libguides.com/citation for you to use whenever you may be writing a paper. These guides are to help you understand what sort of information you need to be citing–basically any ideas or phrases that you did not come up with yourself.

We also have our lovely Info Service Staff, who are always able to lend a helping hand for all your referencing needs. Right now, you can find them at the front desk of the Library or through the "Chat" function on our website, http://www.mhc.ab.ca/library, and can be reached Monday-Friday from 8am to 4pm. If you’re writing late at night, and need to send an email before you forget to, you can also reach them at mhclibrary@mhc.ab.ca. If you are specifically concerned with a piece of music, a picture, or any sort of media related item and whether or not it is copyrighted, we also have a Copyright Specialist who will be able to help with that, as well as a copyright guide, found at https://mhc.ab.libguides.com/c.php?g=715484.

We also have a few books available for you to place a hold on. You can find the titles, authors, and call numbers below:

My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture by Susan D. Blume — PN 167 B48 2009

Doing Honest Work in College: How to Prepare Citations, Avoid Plagiarism, and Achieve Real Academic Success by Charles Lipson — PN 171 F56 L56 2008

Cite It Right: the SourceAid Guide to Citation, Research, and Avoiding Plagiarism by Tom Fox, Julia Johns, and Sarah Keller — PN 171 F56 F69 2007

Don’t Steal Copyrighted Stuff!: Avoiding Plagiarism and Illegal Internet Downloading by Ann Gaines — PN 167 G35 2008

Writing Research Papers: A Complete Guide by James D. Lester — LB 2369 .L4 2015

Copyright Infringement by Roman Espejo — KF 3080 C66 2009

Intellectual Property Law: Copyright, Patents, Trade-marks by D. Vaver — KE 2779 .V38 2011

A Research Agenda for Academic Integrity by Tracey Bretag (eBook–search for the title using the search bar on our website!)

Photo by RF._.studio on Pexels.com

You can find more fun Academic Awareness Week events at the Student’s Association page, found at https://samhc.ca/events/

If you ever have any questions, you can reach us at any of the above chat functions or email addresses, as well as at mhclibrary@mhc.ab.ca. We will do our best to assist!

Happy reading!

Additional Resources:

https://www.plagiarism.org/

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cipointernet-internetopic.nsf/eng/h_wr02281.html

Twas four weeks till the break…

Twas four weeks till the break,
when all through the college,
some small things were stirring,
seeking new knowledge
Don’t know them from last year?
Here’s what’s in store…
Our elves, Paige and Read
are back at it once more!
With last year’s IDs
they knew what to do!
To the Library the skipped
to get them renewed!
And at the Library desk,
oh, something new and inviting!
Canned foods for overdue fines…
How thrilling! How exciting!
Looking to learn,
they planned sneaking to classes,
with gift bags in tow,
working hard for some passes!
With so much to do,
Paige made a decision.
“I’ll use tomorrow’s extended hours
in the Library for revision!”
Now the elves had arrived,
what should they study?
“Let’s try education
and reading to a buddy!”
On the way from the Library
the elves dropped by the centre
for student success,
with writing tips and coaching mentor!
The Library kiosk
was the next stop to be had,
where they booked study rooms
and searched for books that were rad!
With finals approaching,
a relaxing PAWS is sound!
Paige and Read heard about one…
Louie the therapy dog is coming to town!!
(and by town, we mean the Front Lounge of the Vera Bracken Library on Dec 6 from 12-1PM)
Hearing students talk of the databases’ might
They researched the Jewish Festival of Lights.
Celebrating one day of oil that lasted for eight,
the elves wish Happy Hanukkah to all on this date!
With assignments due shortly,
Read loaded up money.
“The campus self-serve printing option
is so simple it’s funny!”
With their printing credits ready
they felt quite at ease,
so they spent some time sitting
in the front lounge at peace.
While enlightenment takes longer
than the time they had free,
our elves call out happily
“Blessed Bodhi Day to thee!”
The extra hour last week
helped Paige out a lot!
This week Read will join her,
4-5 in the Library, for a thought!
This International Human Rights Day
the elves are proud to join in,
Declaring “Elves are for Human Rights!”
But do you know where yours begin?


Check out the Human Rights Support at the College: https://buff.ly/3HTNQTy
The elves were quite pleased
with their health book collection…
though Read still ate too much
that he gave himself indigestion!
With a tummy-ache extreme from reading/eating experimentation,
Paige sought out some help for Read’s health tribulations.
Besides, they knew that in nursing their was talent to unleash…
though the equipment they needed always seemed just out of reach.
In VisCom they painted well into the night,
with even their still-life’s strung with bright lights!
Learning theories of color, design, and composition,
they thought some new paint worth a sleigh branding transition!
To the Library they raced
with their designs freshly sketched,
making vision into 3D reality,
hands and minds both outstretched.
With a few finals left, the break fast approaches…
there is one extended hour in the Library left before its passed.
Join the elves this Friday, till five, for studying time.
It will be merry and bright, holly jolly, and fine!
The elves rubbed their chins
as they took a step back,
diagrams filling up whiteboards
with awesome reindeer jet packs!
The elves entered the gym,
and man, were they psyched!
Before their eyes: the perfect space
for an epic snowball fight!!
As they finished their work
they realized their blunder…
“We haven’t checked in with Santa!
Surely he’s beginning to wonder!”
So they borrowed an OWL
for a virtual meeting,
And seeing familiar faces
they ushered a greeting!
Paige and Read let Santa know
about all the learning they had faced.
And, thanks to their business classes, pitched
that Santa’s workshop be made remote-based!
The elves learned today
what Pancha Ganapati observes;
a celebration with focus

on five realms to preserve!
This day is only the first,

four more will follow in tow…
love of family, friends, associates,

culture, and religion… all grow!!
At the end of the month,
their heads filled to bursting,
they headed to the Library
to do some soul searching.
With the campus soon closing
for the holiday rest
they relaxed in the Library,
restored and refreshed.
With all the fun that was had
they just knew they’d be back,
for these elves have a passion
for learning new facts!

Tune in all through December as more of Paige and Read’s Grand Adventure is told…

What’s Going On: December 2021 Update

Photo by Element5 Digital on Pexels.com

As 2021 draws to a close, we here at the Library have a few exciting announcements to make!

Food for Fines 2021

Food for Fines is returning this December! For the month of December, we’re going to be taking food donations as a way to help students, faculty, and community members pay off any overdue fines they may have!

Any non-perishable food item are accepted, as long as they are unexpired, unopened, and undamaged. We are also able to take some toiletry items, such as toothpaste, shampoos, and conditioners!

FAQ:

Who can participate in Food for Fines?
Anyone with late fines! This includes students, staff, faculty, and community members!

What fines can be waived?
All fines that are attached to overdue materials are eligible. Fines for lost items, processing, or damaged items are not able to be paid through this program.

How much food do I need to donate in order to have my fines waived?
For each food item donated, $1.00 in overdue fines will be waived from your account.

What is the total dollar amount that can be waived with food donations?
There’s no limit! You can keep donating until all your overdue fines are waived!

What are the most-needed items for Food for Fines?
All non-perishable food donations are welcomed, but the most-needed items are:

  • Rice
  • Canned meat (i.e. fish and poultry)
  • Pasta sauce
  • Granola bars
  • Small bottles of shampoo/conditioner
  • Toothpaste

If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out to us and we’ll answer everything we can!

Photo by Julia M Cameron on Pexels.com

Extended Hours

We’re also pleased to announce our December Extended Hours!

On December 3rd, December 10th, and December 17th, the Vera Bracken Library will be open for one extra hour! This means we’ll be open 8am to 5pm on those Fridays! This way you can get all your studying, reading, and collaborating done before the lovely holiday break. (And just in time for final exams!)

Closure: December 9th, 2021

The Library will be closed on December 9th for a department meeting.

Reduced Hours

From December 21st to 23rd, the Library will reduce it’s hours to 8am to 4pm to make way for the new semester!

Winter Break!

The Library and Medicine Hat College will be closed from December 24th, 2021 through to January 3rd, 2022. We look forward to seeing the return of students after a much needed holiday rest!

Photo by Element5 Digital on Pexels.com

If you have any questions about Food for Fines, or any of our hours of operation during the month of December, please just give us a call or stop on by the service desk! We can be reached at 403-529-3867!

Happy reading!

What if textbooks were free? 

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

It’s not a fantasy. No-cost textbooks are becoming a reality at Medicine Hat College (MHC) thanks to the efforts of some intrepid instructors to develop Open Educational Resources (OER). 

What are OER, you ask? According to UNESCO, Open Educational Resources are: 

teaching and learning materials that you may freely use and reuse at no cost, and without  needing to ask permission. […] OER have been authored or created by an individual or  organization that chooses to retain few, if any, ownership rights. (OER Commons,  2021) 

Depending on licensing, materials may be downloaded and shared in their original form, or edited and disseminated in revised versions. 

Photo by fauxels on Pexels.com

One MHC instructor has been particularly committed to developing free resources for his classes. Clinton Lawrence teaches history and art history in the School of Arts, Science & Education. For his classes in World Art Before 1300 CE and World Art Since 1300 CE, he created open access textbooks. With the help of design student Mel Davison, as well library staff like Copyright and OER Specialist Laura Gunn and the library assistant I team, Clint assembled thirty-two chapters in two books that provide all course content, from discussions of prehistoric cave paintings to analyses of the post-impressionists’ commitment to contemporary subject matter. Clint has drawn all materials from open, peer-reviewed sources like Smart History. Check out his textbooks!

Why is Clint so committed to developing OER? He states, “With the increasing costs of education, I felt that I had a duty to find and adopt, whenever possible, robust, high quality OER to lighten students’ financial burden. In addition, there is a great deal of effective material publicly available and these sources give me flexibility to curate course content to support course objectives.” 

Furthermore, he sees serious benefits to increasing the institution’s use of OER:   

“There are several advantages to adopting OER. On Day One of the course, students have access to every resource that they need. Students can customize the sources: download an electronic copy or print the entire work or just print certain parts. The sources are flexible so that I can easily add or exclude content. As the instructor I can use the parts I like from different sources, without incurring extra costs.” 

Sounds like a win for students, instructors, and colleges. 

Learn more about International Open Access Week: Open Access Week – October 25 -31, 2021 | Everywhere 

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

***

Clint Lawrence is an instructor in history and art history, School of Arts, Science, and Education at Medicine Hat College. He completed his undergraduate degree in history at the University of Lethbridge (2011) and his MA (2013) in history. He is currently a PhD student in the war studies program at the Royal Military College of Canada. Clint joined the School of Arts, Science, and Education and art and design program at Medicine Hat College in 2015. His thesis “Charles I and Anthony van Dyck: Images of Authority and Masculinity” focused on Charles I of England’s projection of kingship through van Dyck’s portraits during his personal rule. His current research interests include Indigenous participation in the Second World War, the relationship between the state and Indigenous service members, the post-war treatment of Indigenous veterans, and how post-colonial states craft national memories and memorialize Indigenous war service.

World Mental Health Day 2021

October 10, 2021

Let’s not kid ourselves. The Covid-19 pandemic has been hard. It has disrupted our daily routines, made it impossible, at times, for families and friends to get together, and it has instilled a general sense of worry and anxiety in many of us. Quite simply, the pandemic has had a major impact on people’s mental health, with some faring better than others. On World Mental Health Day, this October 10, 2021, let’s remember to be gentle with ourselves and with others. Let’s learn new strategies for coping. And let’s eliminate the stigma that comes with managing the struggles of mental health.

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

Be Kind to Yourself and Others

It is important that we practice being compassionate to others during these trying times. Listen to others without judgment, encourage those around you, and be patient. The WHO (World Health Organization) notes that having support from those around us, such as family and friends, actually helps people suffering from depression recover faster.

Also, be sure to be kind to yourself. Try to find ways to relax, such as practising mindfulness, meditation, and yoga. Make sure you are taking time for yourself to do things that you can enjoy safely. And be sure you are eating well-balanced meals and getting enough sleep. The library has many collection items to help you support this.

  • The RC 440 section in the library is where you will find books and resources about mental health
  • For mindfulness, look in the BF 637 area of the stacks for helpful materials
  • Want to learn yoga? Look for resources in the RA 781 area of the library collection
  • Materials about meditation techniques can be found in a variety of areas, including the BF, BL and curriculum sections
Image by hudsoncrafted from Pixabay

Learn Strategies for Coping

If you are feeling stressed and anxious, there are many ways to help you cope. Exercising regularly helps you to feel good and maintain your health. Taking deep breaths and using a counting method (counting to 10 slowly, and repeating) can be incredibly useful during moments where you feel overwhelmed or panicked. Keep your sense of humor about you and try to sustain a positive attitude. Do your best, and accept that you cannot control everything. Your best will vary day to day, and week to week, because from one moment to the next, you are never the same. Talk to a friend or family member about your struggles, and let them know how they can help you. Also, pay attention to yourself, and learn what triggers your anxiety. Knowing this will help you to manage stress and cope with your day to day challenges.

  • Want to learn how to cook healthier meals? Check out the many cookbooks the library has to offer in the TX section of the collection
  • Need techniques for getting better sleep? No problem, the library carries many items about this in the QP area of the stacks
  • Would you like to learn more about anxiety and managing it? The RC 531 section of the library collection has many useful resources about this

Mental Health and Counselling for Students at MHC

Students at MHC have access to free counselling services. If you need to speak to someone, please visit: https://www.mhc.ab.ca/Services/CounsellingAndCare/StudentCounselling to make an appointment.

Drop-in counselling sessions are offered on Wednesdays. Appointments are available all day (8 a.m. – 4 p.m.), first come first served, and must be booked that day by calling advising at 403.529.3819 or visiting the advising desk starting at 8 a.m.

Many Canada-Wide Services Are Also Available

  • If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call 9-1-1 or go to your nearest hospital. If you need emotional support, help is available.
  • If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, call the Canada Suicide Prevention Service at 1-833-456-4566 (24/7).
  • Kids Help Phone: Call 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free) or text CONNECT to 686868. Available 24 hours a day to Canadians aged 5 to 29 who want confidential and anonymous care from trained responders.
  • Hope for Wellness Help Line: Call 1-855-242-3310 (toll-free) or connect to the online Hope for Wellness chat. This service is available to all Indigenous peoples across Canada who need immediate crisis intervention. Experienced and culturally sensitive help line counsellors can help if you want to talk or are distressed. Telephone and online counselling are available in English and French. On request, telephone counselling is also available in Cree, Ojibway and Inuktitut.
Photo by Lisa from Pexels

Help Eliminate the Stigma

On World Mental Health Day, this October 10, 2021, let’s all help to reduce the stigma attached to struggles with mental health. Stigma causes people to feel ashamed for something that is out of their control. We can all do this in a number of ways:

  • Talk openly about mental health
  • Educate yourself and others
  • Be conscious of language
  • Encourage equality between physical and mental health
  • Show compassion for those who struggle with mental health
  • Choose empowerment over shame
  • Be honest about treatment
  • Let the media know when they are being stigmatizing
  • Don’t harbor self-stigma

All of us need to raise our voices against stigma. Every day, in every possible way, we need to stand up to stigma and support one another, during the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond.

Sources: National Alliance on Mental Illness, Healthline & Anxiety and Depression Association of America

Digital Citizenship

“[A]ny attack on […] the concept of objective truth […] threatens in the long run every department of thought.”

George Orwell; “The Prevention of Literature” (1946)

Photo Credit: Unsplash

“How do I find reliable news online?”

“How do free Apps make money?”

“What’s clickbait?”

If you’ve ever asked yourself these questions, you’re not alone. In the “post-truth” twenty-first century, our information environment is fraught. Controversies concerning “fake news” and the authority of experts shape our daily lives; fringe media attack the validity of democratic processes and COVID-19 disinformation imperils public health. In online life, being popular and getting lots of “views” often feels more important than telling the truth.

All sources—whether reputable or not—can appear equal in the digital sphere. According to W. Lance Bennett and Steven Livingston in their work, The Disinformation Age: Politics, Technology, and Disruptive Communication in the United States (2020):

Democracies around the world face rising levels of disinformation. The intentional spread of falsehoods and related attacks on the rights of minorities, press freedoms, and the rule of law all challenge the basic norms and values on which institutional legitimacy and political stability depend. (p. xv)

The Internet’s business model heavily contributes to the flow of disinformation. Most search engines and social media platforms rely on advertising in order to make money. They sell users’ data–profile information, browsing history, and lists of purchases–to advertisers, who can then target particular groups with marketing content and, in many cases, covertly influence user behaviour. Advertisers want to attach their content to popular websites and videos, and statistics show that polarizing and highly emotional content tends to go viral. Online disinformation gets lots of views, which makes advertisers happy and generates more revenue for technology companies. The result? More disinformation is generated and promoted.

Wondering why you’ve never learned about any of this in school? Well, now you will.

MHC Library Services recently launched the Digital Citizenship Initiative, an instructional program that will help students untangle the social complexities and ethical dilemmas of the digital world. The project educates students on the economics of the Internet and the means by which political bad actors exploit its platforms to pervert the public discourse. Through classroom activities and reference to a wealth of print and audiovisual resources, participants will learn to recognize and counter disinformation and fake news, and understand how social media companies commodify their data. The program is the Library’s contribution to efforts to address the gap in post-secondary instruction concerning the socio-political and economic dimensions of digital existence. Because we all need to know how the online impacts the IRL.

* * *

Want to see some of our resources?

Check out our eBook and video library on the Digital Citizenship website. Or have a look at our some of our handouts, like our Three-Minute Read on Conspiracy Theories.

International Literacy Day Challenge

“Literacy for a human-centered recovery: Narrowing the digital divide”

Photo by Ekrulila on Pexels.com

International Literacy Day has been celebrated annually since 1967. It is a day where people recognize the importance of literacy and how it is a basic human right. The goal of International Literacy Day is to further the progress we are making to create a more literate and sustainable society. To this day approximately 773 million youth and adults are lacking basic literacy skills. Learning is a lifelong process, it does not stop when you become an adult, and there should always be an opportunity to further progress you literacy skills, no matter your age.

Photo by olia danilevich on Pexels.com

Due to the pandemic, we have seen some literacy divide among people across the world. For example, adult learning programs were not included in the Education Response Plan to Covid-19, thus suspending them and halting adult learning, some children did not have access to the resources they needed to learn (ex: power, internet, etc.), and it amplified the pre-existing inequalities in accessing a good education and basic literary learning opportunities, due to literacy opportunities not being evening spread out among the nation. Covid-19 also amplified the digital divide society experiences as some people did not have access to the technology (computers) necessary to continue their learning.

Photo by Marta Wave on Pexels.com

This year on September 8th, 2021 to celebrate International Literacy Day we will be focusing on a human-centered recovery, where we work to close the gap on literacy and digital divide. We will strive to create a more inclusive learning environment for all people, so that no one gets left behind, and everyone has the chance to further their learning in a way that they value.

Photo by Kaushal Moradiya on Pexels.com

This year on international literacy day pull out a book or your electronic reading device and read for a bit. Your mind will thank you and you can take pride in knowing you are helping create a more literate and sustainable society.

On September 8th, 2021 join other MHC staff and students as we celebrate the International day of Literacy.

Open to all MHC faculty, staff and students, there will be a reading challenge from September 8-14, 2021 as we narrow the global digital divide and build a more literate and sustainable society. Sign up at the Student’s Association, either as a soloist or on a team (up to 4 people) and start READING! Make sure to keep track of minutes read as you spend this week finishing your latest novel or exploring a new book from our reading suggestions. Submit your reading form to the Student’s Association with all reading minutes at the end of the week for your chance to win some awesome prizes!

Photo by Gary Barnes on Pexels.com

Need some help choosing a book that’s right for you?! Take a look at our reading lists below, all items available in our library!

BOOK LISTS FOR YOU!

Challenge Me

  • Ulysses PR 6019 O9 U55 1960
  • Moby Dick PS 2384 M5 1999 or CD Audiobook PS 2384 M6 2009
  • The sound and the fury & : As I lay dying PS 3511 A86 S6 1946
  • Blood meridian PS 3563 C337 B58 2010
  • The Silmarillion PR 6039 O32 S5 2008
  • War and peace Online e-book
  • A tale of two cities PR 4571 A1 1949 OR Online e-book
  • The white racial frame : centuries of racial framing and counter-framing E184.A1 F395 2013
  • Shingwauk’s vision : a history of native residential schools E96.5 .M55 1996
  • Dune PS 3558 E7 D8 2005
  • One hundred years of solitude PQ 8180.17 A73 C513 2006
  • Heroes : the Greek myths reimagined BL783 .F77 2020

On The Go

  • Encyclopedia of Lies Online e-book
  • The Subtweet Online e-book
  • Here Goes Nothing Online e-book
  • Love after the end : an anthology of Two-spirit & Indigiqueer speculative fiction PN6120.92.G39 L68 2020
  • Malagash Online e-book
  • We all go back to the land : the who, why, and how of land acknowledgements Online e-book
  • Weak Planet : Literature and Assisted Survival Online e-book
  • Rebellion Online e-book
  • Shadow Warrior Online e-book
  • The House of One Thousand Eyes Online e-book
  • Alberta Views Online Magazine
  • The New Yorker Online Magazine

Knowledge Seekers

  • High achiever : the incredible true story of one addict’s double life HV5805.J46 A3 2019
  • The gun gap : the influence of gun ownership on political behavior and attitudes HV8059 .J67 2020
  • What difference does it make? : the journey of a soul survivor RC 464 F86 A3 1998
  • Himalaya : a human history DS485.H6 D68 2020
  • Quitter : a memoir of drinking, relapse, and recovery HV5293.B375 A3 2020
  • Empire of pain : the secret history of the Sackler dynasty HD9666.95.S23 K44 2021
  • Learning to love : arranged marriages and the British Indian diaspora HQ802 .P36 2021
  • The power of habit : why we do what we do in life and business BF 335 D78 2012
  • Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail PS3619.T744 .Z46 2013
  • Social media and your brain : web-based communication is changing how we think and express ourselves Online e-book
  • We are displaced : my journey and stories from refugee girls around the world Curriculum Collection 371.822 Yous
  • The truth about luck : what I learned on my road trip with grandma HQ 759.9 R44 2013

I Don’t Like Reading But I Want To

  • Not Being on a Boat Online e-book
  • Sadie PZ7.S95397 Sad 2018
  • The marrow thieves PZ7.D54 Mar 2017
  • The tattooist of Auschwitz PR9639.4.M668 T38 2018
  • When the flood falls Online e-book
  • Friendship PS 3607 O94 F75 2014
  • The hitchhiker’s guide to the galaxy PR 6051 D3352 H57 2005
  • Gods behaving badly PR 6116 H45 G62 2007
  • All the light we cannot see PS 3604 O34 A77 2014
  • The innocents PS8555.R84 I55 2019
  • Small game hunting at the local coward gun club PS8605.O4479 S63 2019
  • The kingmaker’s daughter PR 6057 R386 K5 2012

Days Of Youth

  • The poet X : a novel PZ7.5.A35 Po 2018
  • Genesis begins again PZ7.1.W5456 Gen 2019
  • The Girl of Hawthorn and Glass Online e-book
  • The power PR6101.L43 P69 2017
  • The field guide to the North American teenager PZ7.1.P5165 Fie 2019
  • Five feet apart PZ7.1.L568 Fiv 2019
  • The king of jam sandwiches PZ7.W35 Kin 2020
  • A great and terrible beauty PZ 7 B7386 Gre 2003
  • Twilight PS 3613 E979 T84 2006
  • The Hunger Games PZ 7 C68 Hun 2009
  • Glass Town PN6737.G735 G53 2020
  • Harry Potter and the sorcerer’s stone PZ 7 R79835 Har1 1999

Canadian Authors

  • Jonny Appleseed PS8645.H5498 J66 2018
  • The sun and her flowers PS8621.A695 S86 2017
  • The heart goes last PS 8501 T82 H4 2015
  • The age of hope PS 8553 E665 A33 2012
  • Birdie PS 8623 I63 B57 2015
  • Daydreams of angels : stories PS 8579 N443 D3 2015
  • Tell PS 8567 T3 T44 2014
  • New women : short stories by Canadian women PS 8327 N49 1991
  • Dragons cry PS 8575 W37 D72 2000
  • The wild rose anthology of Alberta prose PS 8255 A4 W54 2003
  • An audience of chairs PS 8555 L355 A92 2006
  • A map of glass PS 8591 R68 M36 2005

Family Reads

  • Alma and how she got her name PZ7.1.M3745 Alm 2018
  • We are water protectors Curriculum Collection 813.6 Lin
  • Song for a whale PZ7.K29639 Son 2019
  • Hike PZ7.1.O86 Hik 2020
  • I am human : a book of empathy PZ7.1.V46 Iam 2018
  • Drawn together PZ7.1.L39 Dr 2018
  • Meet your family = Gikenim Giniigi’igoog Curriculum Collection 897 Bou
  • How to become an accidental activist Curriculum Collection 361.2092 Mac
  • When stars are scattered PN6727.J36 W54 2020
  • The thing about bees : a love letter PZ7.L32317 Thi 2019
  • Eyes that kiss in the corners PZ7.1.H596 Ey 2021
  • Greta and the giants : inspired by Greta Thunberg’s stand to save the world PZ7.1.T83 Gre 2019

Where Are The Pictures

  • To kill a mockingbird : a graphic novel PN6737.F673 T6 2018
  • The Iliad : a graphic novel PN6727.H49 I44 2019
  • My brother’s husband PN6790.J33 T25 2017
  • Speak : the graphic novel PZ7.A54385 Sp 2018
  • My friend Dahmer : a graphic novel HV6515 .D47 2012
  • The great Gatsby : the graphic novel PN6737.F673 G74 2020
  • A game of thrones : the graphic novel PN 6727 A27 G35 2014 v. 3
  • Pride and prejudice and zombies : the graphic novel PN 6737 A87 G7 2010
  • The night wanderer : a graphic novel PN 6733 T39 N54 2013
  • Anne Frank’s diary : the graphic adaptation PN 6790.I753 F65 2018
  • Trinity : a graphic history of the first atomic bomb PN6733.F48 T75 2012
  • Stripmalling Online e-book

Crime and Mystery

  • The lake house PR9619.4.M74 L35 2015
  • The long way home PS 8631 E56 L6 2014
  • Drawing conclusions PS3562.E534 D73 2012
  • Medusa’s scream PE1126.N43 J33 2017
  • Bones are forever PS 3568 E476 B6 2012
  • I was here PZ7.F676 Iwa 2015
  • The racketeer PS 3557 R5355 R23 2013
  • The killer trail PS 8605 A737 K55 2014
  • Company Town PR9199.4.A886 C66 2016
  • The perfect murder PR6060.A472 P47 2014
  • Gone girl PS 3606 L935 G66 2012
  • Mystery Weekly Online Magazine
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Welcoming Everyone Back To The Library While Staying Safe And Healthy This Fall

With public health restrictions in Alberta recently lifted, the MHC Library is ready to welcome back students, faculty, and staff at full capacity.

So what will the Library space look like this fall?

Image by lil_foot from Pixabay

With capacity limits no longer in place, the Library has 321 seats available, including solo and group study spaces, as well as group study rooms which can be booked in advance for up to 2 hours a day.

Physical distancing if recommended and masks are required in all public spaces on campus (this includes the library). It is still important to stay home if you are sick and to to go through the Covid-19 Alberta Health Daily Checklist before heading out for the day. There will be additional cleaning in high-traffic areas at 2pm each day to ensure everyone’s safety.

Image by Alexandra Koch from Pixabay

Printing And Paying Fines

You can self-load your print account using the printer credit icon on the drop-in computers across campus, using a credit card or debit-credit card. The Library also takes cash at the front desk for on-campus printing. You can also pay Library fees online when using debit or credit, or choose the option of paying in cash at the front desk.

Image by Varun Kulkarni from Pixabay

Drop-In Computers, Computer Lab, And Technology Assistance

The drop-in computers and the computer lab will be open and available during the Library’s operating hours. If you require technical help on the computers, we ask that you maintain physical distancing and prefer if you wear a mask, although it is not required. We have virtual options to receive help should you be unable to wear a mask or maintain physical distance.

What Will Borrowing Library Materials Look This Year?

Our stacks will be open this fall, and you will be free to browse the shelves for physical items such as books, DVD’s and curriculum collection items. You can use your student ID card to access thousands of books, magazines, videos, journal articles, and more, both online and in print. Register for your Library account to check what items you have borrowed, re-new your materials, request holds, and double-check your due dates. The self-service hold shelf will still be operational during Library hours, and will be located just inside the entrance to the Library.

If you do not want to browse the shelves for materials in-person, you can still browse the stacks virtually. In our online catalogue, every physical item has a button labeled “browse the shelf” that allows you to see what is available on nearby shelves.

Library will be lending laptops, calculators, and other items that were not available during the last academic year.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Getting/Validating Your Student ID

You can request your virtual student ID through your student dashboard, or you can acquire a physical card in person at the front desk in the Library, just be sure to bring government picture ID to verify your identity. For returning students, validation stickers for the current academic year can be obtained at the front desk in the Library.

Image by silviarita from Pixabay

What If I Need Research Or Citation Assistance This Year?

Both in-person and online research and citation assistance will be available this fall. In-person reference assistance will be available at the front desk of the Library. Please check the website for operational reference hours. You can also book an online research or reference appointment at your convenience by clicking here.

Also be sure to check out the Library’s research guides for help completing your assignments, papers, and exams.

Image by Tumisu from Pixabay

When Is The Library Open?

Both the Vera Bracken Library (Medicine Hat Campus) and Brooks Campus Library are open year round. Hours change over the year, with reduced hours in spring and summer. Check out the Library website for Hours of Operation. Visit us in B-Wing at the Medicine Hat Campus and to the right of the main entrance at our Brooks Campus.

Call: 403.529.3867 (Toll free: 1.866.282.8394)

Email: circulation@mhc.ab.ca

IM: visit www.mhc.ab.ca/library

Text: 587.333.2766